Indonesia

Indonesia Skinhead. No Mans Land Oi!

One of the longest running Indonesian Oi! bands is No Man’s Land. Founded in 1994 they are one of the pioneers in the skinhead
scene overthere. Band based in Malang – Indonesia. Their music, started taking on a different direction and influence, after Didit (Vocal/Guitar) introduced them to Oi! music such as, The Last Resort, The Oppressed, The Strike and The 4skins, Cockney Rejects, The Business etc.
No Man’s Land : 
Didit (Vocal/Guitar) 
Didik (Drum)
Catur (Bass)
Ferry (Guitar)
Once before the three boys formed the band, fery and didik were friends in same high school, but not for didit. He knew them both as playmates at the age of 13 until they were in high school.
Didit was the one who always had musical ideas or direction not commonplace and were sometimes considered extreme to some parents in local community, but they all have the similarities in outlook on social development in which they live. All three friends liked pretty much the same music. And most of all, punk and Oi!, they liked different music too and all three were music lovers. They did not like popular music,-pop music .But liked underground music that tended not be popular music listened too by other youth around them at the time. He was always more critical of the lyrics and music of other bands that might have an influence on them.
And after they graduated from high school, they formed a band called No Man’s Land. They took this name from a war movie they had liked and all seen. No Man’s Land was a punk band they formed which was more of an upbeat, faster and more of a singa long punk rock style.
Their music, started taking on a different direction and influence. After Didit introduced them to Oi! music such as, The Last Resort, The Oppressed, The Strike and The 4skins Cockney Rejects, The Business etc.The first time they recorded it was on very basic, simple equipment. The results for the first time weren’t what they wanted. Determined to make better recordings and sound better, they kept trying, and recorded once more with some additional tracks.
In 1996, they made recording of their new songs in a better studio with better equipment. Each of them would collect a little money for the new recordngs. They all had to utilise their time very well, and work out songs faster and more efficiently. As they could not afford to many recording sessions at the new studio. the personnel at the time have become four. is Catur who encounter at the first time when No Man’s Land played in some gig, then didit offered him to join.
after the master tape was completed,. They took it to a studio which was commonly used to record/press traditional and folk songs. They made 200 copies and distributed them all friend to friend . In a true DIY punk/Oi way. It was extremely rare and unusual for a band to record and distribute their tapes without a label at that time in Indonesia. Some was merch or music from other punk distro’s etc, from other countries.
No Man’s Land formed many good friendships/relationships, in other areas of Indonesia and abroad aswell. Didit corresponded with many friends and fans. Usually writing in the letters, first by introducing his band No Man’s Land. Didit was very diligent with correspondance and keeping up with his fans letters. On average the letters would take about 2 weeks to be delivered upon receivership etc. He was diligent because letter writing was still a main source of communication. As the internet, and internet access for the common people, was still fairly rare at the time. he did it also to make sure , No Man’s Land was given some attention by other scenes, by introducing it to people around the world. And wanted people to know, there was a good and growing punk and Oi scene coming from out of Indonesia.
In 1997, a label from Malaysia offered to make a split tape album with No Man’s Land and a punk band called Karatz from Malaysia. The album was produced in Malaysia, and then distributed to various countries.For the Indonesian market , No Man’s Land would be given royalties.After the sale of 200 copies of the album. The label sent 200 printed covers of the album to No Man’s Land. Then they would make copies of the tapes in a DIY way, and then sell those copies themselves.
In 1998, No Man’s Land recorded their new album. The studio was better and more proffessional than what they had been used to before. The LP ” Grow Away From The Society ” was recorded all in a live session. In this new album they had a faster and more aggressive sound and more intense lyrics, the lyrics were alot to do with social and racial unrest at the time, commenting about riots etc. The album was released by local label, Confuse records. They took no royalties from album sales, but instead passed on the finances to friends who would later construct a record label-distro, and so develop and build it up. To later pay the recording cost of the next album. The distro serves to distribute stuffs such as tapes-cds-t shirts-button pins etc. Which would be made available for anyone to buy, also became a place for the boys to hang out, and socialise etc.
A year after that, No Man’s Land recorded for a new album once again.Called ” All Together Now “. In that album, there was alot of lyrics about the local scene in Malang. The scene was growing bigger at the time, many more punks and skins seemed to be coming up in the scene. No Man’s Land played and average of weekly gigs, but never left town. Due to work commitments, No Man’s Land only played in Malang for a while, but their merch and lp’s were sold all over by friends distro and DIY.
And then in 2001, Didit got married and so did Ferry and Didik. Didit got work out of town. Times changed, the scene seemed to slow down, and No Man’s Land were only playing on average a gig/show a month. Didits mates rarely went to see shows after a time. And Didit barely had time to go see a punk show himself anymore. His work was that full time, that he only got back to home to Malang once a week. But inbetween his and their hectic shedules, they still found a little time to get some band practice in and hang out together.
In 2005, Didit resigned from his out of town work, and started and built up a business with his wife. So then he had plenty of time to get together with his mates again. Then in 2008, No Mans Land went to record some new material after a fair hiatus, of just jamming and prac and no recording. Lyrically and musically they felt they had improved, and seemed they had improved on their sound quality. They were kind of veterans in their scene by now. They took 3 tracks from and old lp, to record on the new material. They didn’t change their sound too drastically, kept it much the same. But just made some subtle adjustments and improvements. The latest lp is scheduled to be released on a European label, and will be out at the end of 2011. No Man’s Land’s expectations for the new album will be realised against the feedback and sales from the current international skinhead scene. Didit and the boys have faith that old fans of No Man’s Land will not be dissapointed, as No Man’s Land has kept true to its lyrical and musical roots, pure , straight up Indonesian Oi!. And at the end of the day, No Mans Land are just happy to play the music they love, and have a laugh and a say. And happy that the Skins/Punks scene is still alive and kicking.
Albums
+ Separatist Tendency (Demo Tape Self-release) 1995
+ P.A.A.S.D.O (LP) KDHC Recs 1996
+ Punk Hey Punk (split cassette) Phisik Scream Ent. Malaysia 1998
+ Grow Away From The Society (LP) Confuse Recs 1998
+ All Together Now  (LP) Rawtape Recs 1999
+ Scattered Around And Buried (CD) OiShop Germany 2012
+ The Best of 1994-2012 (next on Aggro Beat Recs
Compilations
+ Saudara Sebotol (RawTape) 1998
+ Anti Disco League Vol.1 (Templecombe Recs 2006
+ Skins And Punks (CD) M2 Bootboys  Recs 2008
+ Work Together vol.1 ( Virtual Comp.)  Work Together Recs 2012
+ Made In Indonesia (next on Agrro Beat Recs late 2012
Indonesia is one of the countries with a growing skinhead scene. there are Oi! bands from this country. One of the longest running Indonesian Oi! bands is No Man’s Land. Founded in 1994 they are one of the pioneers in the skinhead scene overthere. Band based in Malang – Indonesia. Once before they formed the band, fery and didik were friends in same high school, but not for didit. He knew them both as playmates at the age of 13 until they were in high school.Didit was the one who always had musical ideas or direction not commonplace and were sometimes considered extreme to some parents in local community, but they all have the similarities in outlook on social development in which they live. All three friends liked pretty much the same music. And most of all, punk and Oi!, they liked different music too and all three were music lovers. They did not like popular music,-pop music .But liked underground music that tended not be popular music listened too by other youth around them at the time. He was always more critical of the lyrics and music of other bands that might have an influence on them.And after they graduated from high school, they formed a band called No Man’s Land. They took this name from a war movie they had liked and all seen. No Man’s Land was a punk band they formed which was more of an upbeat, faster and more of a singa long punk rock style.

I claim my self as Skinhead Indonesia

 

 

I claim my self as Skinhead.

 

In early 90′s, it was the begun of our punk/skinhead scene, and it’s very hard to get stuff from abroad, like europe, usa or somewhere.
some people got from abroad, because they had went from there, like for working or studied there. and they back to indonesia, and spread the stuff. and we copied it hand by hands to friends.
and we did not got many information about punk/skinhead, so we must find it by ourself. because no internet at that time here.

which are your favourite bands

all bands with positive lyrics, and great music

what do your family think about you being involved.

no problem with that, they know i running online shop, and i’m selling skinhead clothing.

i live in bintaro, closer place to jakarta.

Tell me about the religion in indonesia and how that effects the skinhead scene

its not really effects. we don’t have problem with that. me for example, i’m protestant, i go to church every Sunday with my family.
for us in scene, religion is our choice.
about case in aceh, its different, Aceh have special laws, in their provinces. they do Syariat Islam there. because the citizens want Syariat Islam there. so they thought, being punk is bad, and it’s western culture.

did you go to see the Last Resort,when they played there?
Of course i went. me and my friends was bring the last resort to play to Indonesia. you can ask them about us. we have great memories with them. good mates! and really humble!

 

what would you like to tell the worldwide scene about indonesia and your friends

Indonesia scene is great!! Punk, Skins, HC kids, Metal, etc so many here, spreading in many cities, and proviences. come and enjoy with our scene.
and that is my point of view about indonesia scene.

REGARD FROM INDONESIA
Oi! Oi!

-ENJI-
PS: sorry with my english, please edit my english words.

Thankyou from England, i think its amazing that the skinhead , punk and many Subcultures have found there way to Indonesia. Keep the Faith

 

Indonesia Punks

Police in Indonesia‘s most conservative province have stripped away body piercings and shaved off mohicans from 65 youths detained at a punk-rock concert because of their perceived threat to Islamic values. The teens and young men were also stripped of dog-collar necklaces and chains and then thrown in pools of water for “spiritual” cleansing, the local police chief, Iskandar Hasan, said on Wednesday.

 

After replacing their “disgusting” clothes, he handed each a toothbrush and barked: “Use it.”

It was the latest effort by authorities to promote strict moral values in Aceh, the only province in this secular but predominantly Muslim nation of 240 million people to have imposed Islamic laws.

Here, adultery is punishable by stoning to death, gay people have been thrown in jail or lashed in public with rattan canes, and women must wear headscarves.

Punk rockers have complained for months about harassment, but Saturday’s roundup at a concert attended by more than 100 people was by far the most dramatic.

Baton-wielding police broke up the concert, scattering young music lovers, many of whom had travelled from other parts of the sprawling archipelagic nation.

Dozens were loaded into vans and brought to a police detention centre in the hills, 30 miles (60km) from the provincial capital, Banda Aceh, for rehabilitation, training in military-style discipline and religious classes, including Qur’an recitation.

They will be held there for at least 10 days, after which they will be returned to their parents.

One 20-year-old detainee, Fauzan, was mortified.

“Why? Why my hair?” he said, pointing to his clean-shaven head. “We didn’t hurt anyone. This is how we’ve chosen to express ourselves. Why are they treating us like criminals?”

But the police chief, Hasan, insisted he had done nothing wrong.

“We’re not torturing anyone,” he said. “We’re not violating human rights. We’re just trying to put them back on the right moral path.”

However, Nur Kholis, a national human rights commissioner, deplored the detention, saying police must explain what criminal laws were violated by the youngsters.

“Otherwise, they violated people’s right of gathering and expression,” Kholis said, and promised to investigate it.

Aceh was given semi-autonomy as part of a peace deal with Indonesia’s central government after the province agreed to end a separatist struggle in 2005.

 

were you there? if so we would love to speak to you, to get the real stories of what happened

 

anda Aceh. Rizal Adi Syaputra says he is a proud punk, but still prefers to hide his dyed red hair under a cap.

The 20-year-old is a member of one of the Aceh capital’s five punk communities that have become the latest target of the province’s Wilayatul Hisbah, or Shariah Police, and Public Order Agency (Satpol PP).

He spent 10 days in detention after being picked up by the Shariah Police, until his parents were able to secure his release.

“I was released recently,” Rizal said. “The officers did not shave my head because my mother told them she would cut my hair off herself. This is why my hair is still intact and not shaven off like my friends.

“There are punks whose heads have been shaved clean by these officers, possibly with the consent of their parents.”

Rizal said his parents were forced to sign a contract with the Shariah Police promising not to repeat his offense. But he said he still had no idea why he had been detained.

Marzuki, who is the head of investigations at Satpol PP and the Shariah Police in Aceh, told the Jakarta Globe that the raids on punks in Banda Aceh were in accordance with existing regulations in the province

“These raids have been verbally sanctioned by the Aceh governor and police chief, and we have received permission through writing from the Banda Aceh mayor,” he said, adding that young punk communities were a public nuisance.

“The presence of punks bothers the general public,” he said. “They are involved in theft, brawls, attacks and assaults in Banda Aceh and Aceh Besar. They are criminals. Their actions are against Acehnese culture and violate Islamic Shariah law.”

At least five punks are currently being “rehabilitated” at the Satpol PP offices through religious studies, Marzuki said.

“They will only be released if their parents pick them up and sign a contract promising that they will not continue what they are doing now,” he said.

“Parents have thanked us because they have been unable to knock sense into their kids who have been influenced by this punk culture.

“If we catch someone three times after having undergone rehabilitation with us, we will hand them over to the police. We only arrest those who have committed crimes.”

Rizal told the Jakarta Globe that he and five friends from the Museum Street Punks community were arrested while they were hanging out at the Blang Padang field near the city center one Saturday night.

He said he joined the punk community in 2009 because he wanted more personal freedom and an outlet to create art.

“We asked the Satpol PP officers why we were being arrested; we were just sitting there,” Rizal said.

He was speaking on the side of a demonstration on Thursday protesting the Shariah Police’s targeting of punks.

“We asked them why we were being arrested, but the Satpol PP officers stayed silent. They did not tell us anything,” he said.

“We, as members of the Museum Street Punks, have never committed any of the acts they have accused us of. We are only involved in social activities,” Rizal said, adding that he and his punk friends had even raised money for the survivors of last year’s Mentawai tsunami.

At the demonstration on Thursday, members of the five punk communities sat together and sang in protest.

The demonstration’s coordinator, 19-year-old Juanda Syahfitrah, said they were angry about the accusations by the Satpol PP and the Shariah Police that punk communities were criminal groups.

“Punk kids are not criminals. We detest the stigma that has been laid on us,” he said, adding that Banda Aceh was home to more than 100 members of different punk communities.

“We have been here forever. Why are they [the Satpol PP] only now arresting us through no fault of our own?

“We are just young people who want to create art, but not for money. We have every right to organize and express ourselves.”