Around The World

Dissension in the Ska Camp

 

Dissension in the Ska Camp

 

 

From April 26, 1964–”Something had to come after the Twist and it appears to be the ‘Jamaica Ska,’ just imported from the Caribbean island by dance lovers of New York’s jet set. Here, at Shepheard’s night spot, where the infectious new dance made its U.S. debut, lovely Carol Joan Crawford (left), Miss World of 1964, pays close attention to the dancers. The ‘Ska’ may be simply described as ‘up-beat blues with a shuffle rhythm.’ Its name evolved out of the sound of the guitar’s up-beat stroke. Miss Crawford, who also hails from Jamaica, is currently touring the U.S. for the first time.”

The premiere of the ska in America was controversial then, as it is now. I recently found an article from 1964 called “Dissension in the Ska Camp” that shows even when musicians were in the thick of it, it was a contested issue of who was included and who was excluded, who created it first and who was following suit. So I today I share this article that appeared in the Sunday Gleaner, April 26, 1964 that shows these topics were just as relevant and talked about then as they are now, even more so. The article has no byline so it is not evident who wrote the piece, but Ronnie Nasralla and Prince Buster chime in with their opinions.

First, let’s set the scene. Referenced in this article is the event at Shepheard’s Club, seen above in the photo. This nightclub was located in the Drake Hotel on Park Avenue in Manhattan. It was a hotspot. It was hip and posh and cool. Big stars stayed at the Drake, including Frank Sinatra and Muhammad Ali and later Led Zeppelin and Slade. But Shepheard’s was also swanky and the hot dances of the day, like the Frug, were not only danced here, but unveiled here. So too was the Ska. Shepheard’s even produced a flyer called, “How to Do the Newest Discotheque Dances at Shepheard’s in New York’s Drake Hotel” with step-by-step instructions to dance the Jerk, Watusi, Frug and the Monkey.

The event at Shepheard’s Club was prior to the World’s Fair. This event was held in April, whereas the World’s Fair wasn’t until August of 1964. However, Jamaica’s tourism efforts began before the World’s Fair in anticipation of creating a buzz and capitalizing on the dance craze trend. You may remember the photo I posted with Arthur Murray’s wife and Ronnie Nasralla from this evening at the Shepheard’s Club, and above is another rare gem.

Without further ado, the article:

National sound hits New York but now the argument flares as to what it is and who started it!

DISSENSION IN THE SKA CAMP

LIKE a raging fire, the promotional tour of the Jamaican National Sound, the Ska, has started a smoldering in the underbrush of the Kingston music world from which this distinctive brand of music was born.

Everyone wants to prove who is the true exponent of the Ska and who originated it? What is the authentic style of the Ska dancing? Successful though the promotional tour to the U.S. was, enthusiastic though the reports which came back treat the appearance of a Jamaican troupe of dancers and artistes at the Shepheard’s Club, there is dissension in the camp.

Some artistes who made the trip say their sound was not promoted as much as certain other sounds. Some of the artistes say that some of the other artistes didn’t have a clue about Ska dancing and in fact did the Monkey, the Wobble, the Twist . . . anything but true Ska.

Reports from the other side say that the moves done at Shepheard’s were moves decided on and rehearsed for several nights, together, before the team left the island.

To the accusation that other records were promoted over others, we discover from Mr. Winston Stona of the Jamaican Tourist Board, a co-sponsor of the promotional venture that:

The junket to the Shepheard’s Ska dancing, backed up over recorded music. Shepheard’s is one of a current crop of New York Clubs called discotheques. In this night spot feature entertainment comes from records played on a large turntable, from an amplification booth much like the Jamaican sound system of the dance halls.

According to the Tourist Board spokesman, the promotional venture for the Ska, as suggested by Henri Paul Marshall and Roland Rennie, the music promotion experts who came to the island last month on the invitation of the Ministry of Development and Welfare, was that Ska records and not personal performances by the artistes, would be projected.

The records which were taken to Shepheard’s therefore, were a selection made on the suggestion of the experts who, on their visit to the island, listened to the work of various Ska exponents. The records chosen for promotion were the ones which the experts deemed most likely to catch on with the American public.

These records included the works of Prince Buster, Derryck Morgan, Eric Morris, and others known to the local Ska followers.

Why should there be dissension? Among the tunes featured at Shepheard’s was “Sammy Dead,” the old Jamaican folk tune restyled as Ska by Byron Lee and the Dragonaires, featuring the voice of Eric Morris. Certain members of the troupe to Shepheard’s say “Sammy Dead” was promoted over other tunes.

According to Mr. Stona, “Sammy Dead” was actually played twice at the beginning and at the end of the programme of Ska records which he presented to the Shepheard’s audience.

It was also revealed that “Sammy Dead” which is to be released on a Capitol label in the States was specifically promoted on the request of Capitol records.

Prince Buster and the other early devotees of the Ska say this should not be so. And they throw in the argument that in their opinion “Sammy Dead” is not a true Ska tune and why should it be played even one more time than any of the others, which are reorganized as real Ska by the real Ska fans?

Prince Buster, who took the Ska to England where it is known now as the Blue Beat, was very expressive about this. He says he is one of the originators of the Ska and sees no reason why he and others, who worked together on the National Sound, should not have got as big billing.

But who really originated the Ska? As Buster tells it, it was back in 1958 that he, Derryck Morgan, Eric Morris and others used to meet on top of an old house situated on Charles Street near Orange Street. The meetings were inspired because “as boys together, we were looking at making a brand.”

He points out that a number of Jamaican musicians had tried adopting American shuffle sounds to their own style, but it didn’t really work. There was need for “our own sound.” So those meetings on top of the house was to find out just how to make things work, how to find a Jamaican sound which the fans would go for.

Down on the ground you might say the big sound system operators Duke Reid and Coxson were evolving their own sound. It was an adaptation of certain American shuffle tunes re-recorded for the sound system dance audiences. It is said that when the experimenters offered Duke Reid and Coxson the new Jamaican sound they would have nothing to do with it.

According to Buster, the new sound when it was evolved was referred to with great disdain by other musicians and by the public as the Boop-Boop. He even earned the name Boop. And when he and Derryck Morgan, for a promotional stunt, launched Boop-Boop songs deriding each other the public really went for their skins.

But out West, the thump of the Boop, later is to be called Sca, then Ska, was catching on. Musicians who had “boxed around” in various musical combos began to be reorganized as “Ska beaters.” Out west and on the east, they could tell you and still tell you about Drumbago who played the drums and Ja Jerry, Theophilus Beckford, and Raymond Harper, Rupert “Blues” Miller, and Stanley Notice.

These according to the fans and on Orange Street and (unreadable) where sound boxes thump through the Saturday night of every week were the original ska men.

As the craze progressed, getting popularity most of all on JBC’s Teenage Dance Party, other musicians joined the parade, cut dies, met for sessions, helped the sound to grow.

The fans began to acclaim Baba Brooks, Roland Alphonso, Lloyd Brevet, Lloyd Tate, Don Drummond, Lester Sterling, Johnny Moore, Lloyd Knibb and the men whose full names nobody remembers but rather a name like Jackie, Charlie, and Campbell. Later they were joined by the acclaimed pure jazz, tenor man, Tommy McCook.

The Ska caught on, spread and grew, most of all in the Saturday night sound system headquarters such as Forrester’s Hall, Jubilee Tile Gardens, Carnival and Gold Coast on Sundays.

Sound system operators worked feverishly to get the latest biscuits on disc. Early on release, they bore no labels, but the dance hall spies got the names eventually and the sound system which didn’t have the new biscuit last week, acquired it this week, to draw the fans.

It is interesting to find a parallel in the discotheques which began in Paris and spread to London and New York.

In the process of finding who should get credit for what, it is eye opening to hear Prince Buster saying that Louise Bennett played her part in the promotion of this peculiarly Jamaican sound and dance. He says that Louise’s life work of keeping alive the folk songs and rhythms of Jamaica is responsible for many of them coming back into popularity, set against the Ska beat.

Many of the musicians and artistes associated with the Ska movement are fairly young men. However, one of the acknowledged originators and Dean of the Sound has been playing music in Kingston for 46 years.

He is Drumbago the drummer who also plays a flute. His real name is Arkland Parks and (unreadable) Mapletoft Poulle and Frankie Bonnitto.

Drumbago, a mild mannered gentleman, says he and Rupert Miller, a bass player for 36 years, were in on the original search to find the sound which came to be called Ska. He explains their best arrangement of the sound as being basically four beats to the bar in eight or twelve measures.

“You get the sound according to how you invert the beats,” says Drumbago.

Another exponent of Ska and its various offshoots feel that the dance called Wash Wash has every claim to being truly Jamaican, for it is inspired by one of the basic Jamaican show dances … the wash day scene. This is a standard with many nightclub rhumba dancers, with many folk lore troupes.

So what constitutes Ska dancing?  According to the fanatics, true Ska motions are the wash wash, the peculiar washing motion of either clothes or the body, the press along, in which the  dancer thumps out the rhythm with his arms at shoulder level, the move (for which we found no

name) of spiraling down to floor level and back up, the one in which you moved the hips and pumped the arms in the opposite direction to the press along.

The fans say that while the extempore movements are allowed dancing the Ska, these are the definite basic movements which one must know to be IN.

Dissenters from the troupe which performed at Shepheard’s say these movements were not used fully or enough and that at one stage they heard a critic saying that what was being done was nothing new, it looked like a first cousin to the Twist. And that the Monkey and the Pony movements which were done were recognized as old hat immediately.

Mr. Stona says this accusation is not true. He found nothing but satisfaction for the presentation at Shepheard’s and is optimistic for the future of Ska promotion in the United States.

We contacted a spokesman for the Byron Lee and the Dragonaires outfit who made “Sammy Dead.”

He told of having heard the feeling expressed by some of the original Ska sound makers that certain orchestras now playing the sound were only cashing in and didn’t know how the sound began.

The Byron Lee spokesman—Mr. Ronnie Nasralla—says:

“For Byron Lee and the Dragonaires it’s not just cashing in. I know Byron feels that it is full time Ska was organized and promoted so that the best can be got out of it for the benefit of the artistes and Jamaica.”

According to Mr. Nasralla:

“Many Ska artistes were not properly protected or organized before Byron Lee has signed up several artistes for recordings and appearances and we’re taking all steps to see that they’re properly presented.”

“I’ve heard that some people say that Byron Lee is just promoting his orchestra. It’s not true. Sure, as a businessman he will look out for his investments, but let us stop quarrelling among ourselves and promote the sound not only for the good of one band but for all Jamaica.”

Whatever comes of it, Ska is going to be a talking point for many more months. Ironically, like most things, it was an art without honour in its own country until it was discovered somewhere else.

Stay tuned for next week’s blog when I will post a response to this article that appeared in the Daily Gleaner the following Sunday. Apparently the comments made by Ronnie Nasralla and Prince Buster struck a chord and a number of musicians responded with their thoughts, including Eric Monty Morris, Roy Panton, Ronnie Nasralla again, Alphanso Castro, Sir Lord Comic, and Roy Willis who respond with comments of their own.

 

The Dead (Sweden)

the Dead live 27 September 2013 @ Club Corazon Östersund
In the 27th september of 2013 The Dead (Local punkgroup) was playing with the Shitfucks and some hipster punk group called Knivderby (didnt bother to see them because i think they are awful)
I had a few beers on the way to the gig so i wouldnt need to spend a fortune on expensive beer, When i arrived it was crowded with people and the first band were the Shitfucks, no one in the band knew how to play any instruments but they pulled it of great anyways and got everyone in the mood.
The second band playing were The Dead, as soon as they got up on the stage and started playing some got up from the tables and joined the mosh, In the corner of my eye i notice that someone who had to much to drink gets smacked and falls out of his chair.
The Dead were absolutely brilliant and managed to get a decent mosh.
When the Dead finished their set i went out from the gig and straight to the pub where i met up with some friends.
Another thing to mention is that the punk scene in Östersund is pretty small but it is quality bands coming from it.
By Jimmy öststorm

Agent Bulldogg (Swedish Oi!))

Agent Bulldogg Started rehearsing in Thomas bedroom (much to his parents’ enjoyment) back in March 1986 after about half a year or so of talking about it, recruiting members and getting hold of equipment through various ways. After another year of learning, and a move to the legendary – in Täby anyway – Vita Huset (The White House) for rehearsals we played our first gig in the early summer of 1987. We played a couple of more gigs that year and also recorded a demo before original bass player Micke were replaced by Jens in early 1988. That line-up continued to play any gigs we could get, and also managed to record some songs who found their way onto a compilation album as well as recording our debut album – “Livsstil” (A Way of Life) – in 1990.

 

 

It wasn’t actually released until 1992 (on our own label) and by then Jens had left the band only to be replaced by Jarl. With this line up we played in Germany, Finland and Austria and also recorded our second album “Ett Tusen Glas” (One Thousand Glasses) – again on our own label – together with the new member Johan on saxophone and keyboards. When we released it 1995, Jarl had left and was replaced by Olof. We continued doing gigs, in Norway for instance, before original guitarist Andreas – more known as Bogh – decided that enough was enough and left. A friend of a friend’s friend then joined briefly, but that didn’t quite work out so Daniel stepped in for a while. However Olof moved to Switzerland and original drummer Magnus became both disillusioned and pre-occupied with his new job so he decided to leave as well. Olof stepped in to do some studio work and together with some help from a couple of other friends two tracks for the compilation album Brewed In Sweden were recorded and released 2002.

Thomas and Johan continued to write a couple of songs but with no other members available it started to fizzle out. However the band never officially broke up, so when a friend asked if we could play a couple of songs for his 40th birthday, Thomas and ex-bass player Jens teamed up with 3 members of Antipati to do so.

We got a few more offers of doing gigs so it just felt natural to continue with that line-up, although Reidar decide to leave due to other commitments a couple of years later.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since then the band has played in Belgium, England, France, Germany, Poland and Spain as well as some festivals and other various gigs in Sweden, and also released a split 7″ with The Templars, contributed to a four band split (with Gimp Fist, Sandals and Booze & Glory) and released a new EP “Vi Är Tillbaks” (We Are Back…) on tour own label – as always. The current line-up is: Thomas (vocals), Johan (guitar), Robert (guitar), Jens (bass) and Thobbe (drums)

Agent Bulldogg are special guest at The Great Skinhead Reunion, and we will be all be helping them to celebrate Swedens national day, in Brighton, England June 6th -8th 2014

“Semarang SKA Fest 2012″

My name adi,im skinhead from central java indonesia,me and some friends here have event ska fest in november 2012
pls help us to uploading this event in subcultz.com :


Semarang Ska foundation & Semarang Skinheads
Proudly present:

“Semarang SKA Fest 2012″
11/17/2012, 3PM-11PM
Venue: taman budaya raden saleh
Semarang,central java-Indonesia

Skankin all nite long with many indonesian Ska bands:
The authentics,Aimee,the siscandens,djakartalites,Appolo 10,bandung inikami orchestra,banana steadybeat,the mobsters,ibaratskata,yanto brothers,ILME,one step beyond,skatone army

And also the guest stars:
Mr T-Bone,chris murray

Tickets: IDR 65000 (presale)

Contact person:
Adi Pratama
+62 857 188 18 467

Thank you for your willingness to help us

Best regards,
Adi Pratama

Indonesia Skinhead. No Mans Land Oi!

One of the longest running Indonesian Oi! bands is No Man’s Land. Founded in 1994 they are one of the pioneers in the skinhead
scene overthere. Band based in Malang – Indonesia. Their music, started taking on a different direction and influence, after Didit (Vocal/Guitar) introduced them to Oi! music such as, The Last Resort, The Oppressed, The Strike and The 4skins, Cockney Rejects, The Business etc.
No Man’s Land : 
Didit (Vocal/Guitar) 
Didik (Drum)
Catur (Bass)
Ferry (Guitar)
Once before the three boys formed the band, fery and didik were friends in same high school, but not for didit. He knew them both as playmates at the age of 13 until they were in high school.
Didit was the one who always had musical ideas or direction not commonplace and were sometimes considered extreme to some parents in local community, but they all have the similarities in outlook on social development in which they live. All three friends liked pretty much the same music. And most of all, punk and Oi!, they liked different music too and all three were music lovers. They did not like popular music,-pop music .But liked underground music that tended not be popular music listened too by other youth around them at the time. He was always more critical of the lyrics and music of other bands that might have an influence on them.
And after they graduated from high school, they formed a band called No Man’s Land. They took this name from a war movie they had liked and all seen. No Man’s Land was a punk band they formed which was more of an upbeat, faster and more of a singa long punk rock style.
Their music, started taking on a different direction and influence. After Didit introduced them to Oi! music such as, The Last Resort, The Oppressed, The Strike and The 4skins Cockney Rejects, The Business etc.The first time they recorded it was on very basic, simple equipment. The results for the first time weren’t what they wanted. Determined to make better recordings and sound better, they kept trying, and recorded once more with some additional tracks.
In 1996, they made recording of their new songs in a better studio with better equipment. Each of them would collect a little money for the new recordngs. They all had to utilise their time very well, and work out songs faster and more efficiently. As they could not afford to many recording sessions at the new studio. the personnel at the time have become four. is Catur who encounter at the first time when No Man’s Land played in some gig, then didit offered him to join.
after the master tape was completed,. They took it to a studio which was commonly used to record/press traditional and folk songs. They made 200 copies and distributed them all friend to friend . In a true DIY punk/Oi way. It was extremely rare and unusual for a band to record and distribute their tapes without a label at that time in Indonesia. Some was merch or music from other punk distro’s etc, from other countries.
No Man’s Land formed many good friendships/relationships, in other areas of Indonesia and abroad aswell. Didit corresponded with many friends and fans. Usually writing in the letters, first by introducing his band No Man’s Land. Didit was very diligent with correspondance and keeping up with his fans letters. On average the letters would take about 2 weeks to be delivered upon receivership etc. He was diligent because letter writing was still a main source of communication. As the internet, and internet access for the common people, was still fairly rare at the time. he did it also to make sure , No Man’s Land was given some attention by other scenes, by introducing it to people around the world. And wanted people to know, there was a good and growing punk and Oi scene coming from out of Indonesia.
In 1997, a label from Malaysia offered to make a split tape album with No Man’s Land and a punk band called Karatz from Malaysia. The album was produced in Malaysia, and then distributed to various countries.For the Indonesian market , No Man’s Land would be given royalties.After the sale of 200 copies of the album. The label sent 200 printed covers of the album to No Man’s Land. Then they would make copies of the tapes in a DIY way, and then sell those copies themselves.
In 1998, No Man’s Land recorded their new album. The studio was better and more proffessional than what they had been used to before. The LP ” Grow Away From The Society ” was recorded all in a live session. In this new album they had a faster and more aggressive sound and more intense lyrics, the lyrics were alot to do with social and racial unrest at the time, commenting about riots etc. The album was released by local label, Confuse records. They took no royalties from album sales, but instead passed on the finances to friends who would later construct a record label-distro, and so develop and build it up. To later pay the recording cost of the next album. The distro serves to distribute stuffs such as tapes-cds-t shirts-button pins etc. Which would be made available for anyone to buy, also became a place for the boys to hang out, and socialise etc.
A year after that, No Man’s Land recorded for a new album once again.Called ” All Together Now “. In that album, there was alot of lyrics about the local scene in Malang. The scene was growing bigger at the time, many more punks and skins seemed to be coming up in the scene. No Man’s Land played and average of weekly gigs, but never left town. Due to work commitments, No Man’s Land only played in Malang for a while, but their merch and lp’s were sold all over by friends distro and DIY.
And then in 2001, Didit got married and so did Ferry and Didik. Didit got work out of town. Times changed, the scene seemed to slow down, and No Man’s Land were only playing on average a gig/show a month. Didits mates rarely went to see shows after a time. And Didit barely had time to go see a punk show himself anymore. His work was that full time, that he only got back to home to Malang once a week. But inbetween his and their hectic shedules, they still found a little time to get some band practice in and hang out together.
In 2005, Didit resigned from his out of town work, and started and built up a business with his wife. So then he had plenty of time to get together with his mates again. Then in 2008, No Mans Land went to record some new material after a fair hiatus, of just jamming and prac and no recording. Lyrically and musically they felt they had improved, and seemed they had improved on their sound quality. They were kind of veterans in their scene by now. They took 3 tracks from and old lp, to record on the new material. They didn’t change their sound too drastically, kept it much the same. But just made some subtle adjustments and improvements. The latest lp is scheduled to be released on a European label, and will be out at the end of 2011. No Man’s Land’s expectations for the new album will be realised against the feedback and sales from the current international skinhead scene. Didit and the boys have faith that old fans of No Man’s Land will not be dissapointed, as No Man’s Land has kept true to its lyrical and musical roots, pure , straight up Indonesian Oi!. And at the end of the day, No Mans Land are just happy to play the music they love, and have a laugh and a say. And happy that the Skins/Punks scene is still alive and kicking.
Albums
+ Separatist Tendency (Demo Tape Self-release) 1995
+ P.A.A.S.D.O (LP) KDHC Recs 1996
+ Punk Hey Punk (split cassette) Phisik Scream Ent. Malaysia 1998
+ Grow Away From The Society (LP) Confuse Recs 1998
+ All Together Now  (LP) Rawtape Recs 1999
+ Scattered Around And Buried (CD) OiShop Germany 2012
+ The Best of 1994-2012 (next on Aggro Beat Recs
Compilations
+ Saudara Sebotol (RawTape) 1998
+ Anti Disco League Vol.1 (Templecombe Recs 2006
+ Skins And Punks (CD) M2 Bootboys  Recs 2008
+ Work Together vol.1 ( Virtual Comp.)  Work Together Recs 2012
+ Made In Indonesia (next on Agrro Beat Recs late 2012
Indonesia is one of the countries with a growing skinhead scene. there are Oi! bands from this country. One of the longest running Indonesian Oi! bands is No Man’s Land. Founded in 1994 they are one of the pioneers in the skinhead scene overthere. Band based in Malang – Indonesia. Once before they formed the band, fery and didik were friends in same high school, but not for didit. He knew them both as playmates at the age of 13 until they were in high school.Didit was the one who always had musical ideas or direction not commonplace and were sometimes considered extreme to some parents in local community, but they all have the similarities in outlook on social development in which they live. All three friends liked pretty much the same music. And most of all, punk and Oi!, they liked different music too and all three were music lovers. They did not like popular music,-pop music .But liked underground music that tended not be popular music listened too by other youth around them at the time. He was always more critical of the lyrics and music of other bands that might have an influence on them.And after they graduated from high school, they formed a band called No Man’s Land. They took this name from a war movie they had liked and all seen. No Man’s Land was a punk band they formed which was more of an upbeat, faster and more of a singa long punk rock style.

Sara Silva

My name is Sara Silva and I am Portuguese. I am 29 years old and currently live in the south of Portugal in Faro. After finishing my degree in Graphic Design from the University of Algarve in 2007, started working as a freelancer in design and as a collaborator in the studio of tattoos and piercings Freak Shop, where i currently work as a full time as body piercer.
I started drawing as a child, I studied art in high school and went into graphic design.
In my illustrations use my main theme is skinhead culture composition, dynamic fruit of my artistic evolution and personal . My inspiration comes from the music I hear, the lifestyle I have, to my personal experience and artitist and my everyday struggle in life. I try to combine traditional design with more digital techniques to create a more personal and current mixture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roy Ellis Video

Roy Ellis at Skinhead Reunion 2012

Hitting the Skinhead Reunion 2012 is the legend Roy “Skinhead Moonstomp” Ellis.  Ellis, who has been on the scene since the late 60′s, will be heading to Brighton this June to shock and awe the boys and girls in attendance.  He comes tight with a new 7″ recorded for Liquidator and he’s recently finished up a music video for the single, “You Can’t Leave Now “ shot in Spain by Mobley Street’s Laurel Parker.  If you’d like to see a sample of the video, check out this ad for a piece of equipment used on set https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mobley-Street-Productions/100346513393183

Roy Ellis was the singer and songwriter for Symarip, one of the first skinhead reggae bands to specifically target the scene.  Their hits include Skinhead Girl, Skinhead Jamboree and, of course, Skinhead Moonstomp.  As a solo act, Mr. Symarip, as Roy is also known, puts on an amazing show full of energy.  If his moves don’t get you, his suits certainly will.  Each is custom made in England in the tradition of the day.  Don’t miss him and make sure you pick up a 7” before they’re gone!

 

Make sure you check out all the outta sight releases from Liquidator at http://www.liquidatormusic.com/en and if you want to see more reggae videos from Chris Murray to Los Granadians go to www.mobleystreet.com

Bootboys Chile

Well Bootboys began in April after finishing with my previous band (the bandio). I searched everywhere a guitarist until I found Chuleta members of a psychobilly band. He supported my project to make oi! British,we started writing songs with electronic drums because in my city is very difficult to find a good drummer .Then  a friend joined us, helping in the chorus  and keeps us in the band supporting at all times. After we made our first demo called “my beers, my fights” in a small study because in my city is very high the cost of a professional recording studio. After a while we recorded our first video clip, there were many problems  recording the video: infighting at the time, By the way we do feel proud to be the first skinhead  band in Chile recording a video clip (“beers everywhere”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Yf0qggsTUI). After that we played in our city and then in the capital of my country. Until that moment  the guitar and bass was recording by Chuletabut finally  we found a bassist from another city called Karlos, and today we are joined by a drummer named Bryan who is from the capital.. Now we have  the second demo called “kings of the streets” and soon will record our second video “skinhead rock” and new Bootboys’s proyects.greetings from chile!buenos bootboys comienza en el mes de abril despues de aver terminado con mi reciente banda (the bandio)busco a un guitarrista por todos lados hasta que encuentro a chuleta ex intregrante de una banda psychobilly que apoya mi proyecto de realizar oi! britanico empezamos a crear temas con bateria electronica.porque en mi ciudad muy dificil de encontrar un baterista decente, en los ensayos llega un amigo nuestro que nos ayuda en los coros y se queda con nostros en la banda apoyando  en todo momento,  despues realizamos nuestro  primer demo llamado” mis cervezas ,mis peleas” donde  el chuleta graba guitarra y bajo en un estudio pequeño porque en mi ciudad es muy alto el costo de un  estudio de grabacion profesional.despues de un tiempo grabamos nuestro primer video clip donde hubo muchos problemas al grabar el video por peleas internas en el momento ,nose sentimos orgullos en  ser la primera banda skinhead  de chile en grabar un video clip(cervezas por todas partes)despues de eso logramos tocar en nuestra ciudad y en la capital de mi pais ,y se nos une una bajista de otra ciudad llamado karlos ,con el realizamos el segundo demo llamado “reyes de las calles” y hoy en dia  se nos une un baterista llamado bryan que es de santiago y pronto grabaremos nuestro segundo video “rock skinhead” y nuevos proyectos con bootboys.saludos desde chile!

A View With NU!!! ~ #1

<- Pic of Me! 

JROCK – Good or Bad?

Japanese music started off as a mixture of popular and distinct styles, from Classical, Folk and Traditional, originating from as early as the thirteenth century. The oldest forms of Traditional and Folk music in Japan are Buddhist Chanting, Orchestral Court music and Biwa hōshi (otherwise known as stories created by Lute performances.) Into the 1960’s the Japanese youth became very influenced by the modern rock genre, as a well-known modern rock band, The Beatles, who becomeinternationally active in 1964. By the time the 80’s band ‘Japan’ appeared, Japan’s music industrywas determined to show the western world their talents of making rock/punk culture internationally cultivating. Now in 2012, Japan is the second biggest music market in the world, behind the United States.

Jrock however, is a fairly new, popular choice by people from their teens to their twenties and here’s why!

This is Mana Sama, known and loved internationally from the band Moi Dix Mois. Now you may be thinking ‘My goodness he looks Pete Burns without the eye-patch’, which is what many people I showed this idol to said the first time. You may also be thinking he has taken the feminine gothic look that Dead or Alive one had and has simply put that in his own group. REMEMBER, these are biased opinions that fellow friends, family, ect, have expressed.

Here’s a fan’s strongly worded reply to the subject on biased opinions towards Jrock.

 

Rien Xi, 17, Birmingham
Common interests ~ Elegant Gothic Lolita & Aristocrat and Ouji fashion, Music (particularly Jrock and Classical), vampire, horror novels and tea!

“The people, who are quick to judge and insult Mana, obviously have no idea of the kind of person he is. Mana is an inspiration to thousands of people; he is a musician, an artist, the creator of a fashion and an intriguing human being with so much to offer to the world. Everything he does is inspiring, he has made a name for himself and has fans and followers all over the globe, so you may not like him, but you can’t deny the fact that he is talented. Those who talk badly of him because of the way he looks, without knowing anything about him, are obviously close-minded, simple and immature individuals. “Oh, he looks like Pete Burns.” Sure, maybe he does look like Pete Burns in your opinion… but what does that matter? Mana is beautiful and I feel sorry for those who can’t recognise that fact. He is an extraordinary person and he is clearly un-phased by hateful comments and opinions.  Even so, it’s quite pathetic to talk badly of somebody who looks different or is into something that you are not. It’s sad that people are still so close-minded and ignorant in this day and age.”

So many J-fans, as I call them, have participated in a wide variety of social events, such as; Gigs, Expos, Festivals and many gatherings discussing music, anime shows, fashion and most popularly the imaginative sexual stories between band members, aka ‘Fanservice’. A short while ago I was into this subculture and it took me on an extreme emotional adventure. When I had turned fourteen my gothic-cyber scene was abounded and I had found a new ‘alternative’ to become intrigued with and that was the commonly known Japanese street fashion Decora. I found out about the new exciting scene from my pen pal in China, whom herself was in high school and the same age as me. Of course due to our ridiculously random sense of humour, we clicked straight away and after 3 weeks were listening and fan-girling about the popular Jrock band ‘The Gazette’. From there I had changed my look on fashion, my future and which Japanese musician I had on my bedroom wall and had already booked a ticket to see my first live Jrock band – ‘Dio –distraught overlord-. On-top of being overly excited and screaming every 10 minutes before the gig in London, I was nervous beyond belief because of meeting a few people I knew but hadn’t met until that night. Thankfully, it all went well and to this day I still know those people who are now some of my closest friends including my boyfriend who I’ve been with for three years.  When I joined the queue outside the venue in Camden, I had heard rumours that people had camped outside for four days in the freezing cold in order to get right to the front of the stage, which until this day, I really didn’t see the point in. The whole night was fantastic, everyone really enjoyed themselves, so much so in fact, that some particularly obsessed fans were known to grope parts of the bands “private places” (yes, fans can get this horny in the pit)! It was all blood, sweat and tears when the gig was over as we were chanting for the band to come back on stage. But eventually they left, and I have to say, that was the most mad music experience of my life. Most Jrock gigs can get so wild that people get injured, mostly like metal gigs but with a lot more high-pitched screaming. But never fear, the security guards are always there to help (yeah, right). Unfortunately there are a lot of aspects about Jrock and Jfans that I don’t agree with. People often become so absorbed in the culture and its specific fashion that they take on a high school dynamic. People can get bitchy and arrogant, constantly passing judgment on any new people that don’t quite fit in with the strict unsaid rules, which from where I am is unheard of in metal gigs. And I ask you this, how do you think the band would feel if they found out about how their fans were promoting the gig experience?

Thankfully most people from the gig aren’t like that. Like i said, lots of them I’m still friends with and a lot of people agree with the problems that occur at gigs and gatherings, for instance my friend Keita who has been a lover of Jrock for over ten years –

Keita-Eiri Uesugi, 22, Boston/Lincoln

Common interests: Kamijo, reading, writing and drawing.

“For the past few years, I can quite safely say that Jrock has certainly been a big inspiration. I think, in some respects, it’s helped me to find out who I am and to not be afraid of stepping out of the box and being different; I can be myself and don’t have to feel I have to follow the crowd. Not only that, but it has helped to fuel my style of writing and the way that I draw as well and being a creative person, inspiration in the form of music is a pretty important thing. Good aspects of Jrock would have to be the appreciation that the whole songs get, from vocals, through the bass line and everything else in-between. I have found in the past, compared to western bands where the vocalist is the front man, the rest of the musicians seem to be ignored and bundled in the background… but with Jrock, it’s different. Also, there are so many styles within the Jmusic scene, that there literally is something to please everyone, whether it’s pop rock, symphonic metal and so on. Sadly, with all things, there is a downside. The level of competitiveness between fans cannot be denied and this often puts people off. Also, because the music is essentially sung in Japanese, this can course a lot of close minded people or none-listeners to turn their ears to what they do understand. “

On a lighter note though, Jrock music is a fantastic genre and has been widely recommended by such companies as Neo magazine, Kerrang and Moshi Moshi and of course, me. It has inspired me throughout the years to change my life and my career which is to work with the artist Hayao Miyazaki from Studio Ghibli.

SEE IF YOU CAN PICK ME OUT FROM THIS OLD NEO ARTICLE - 

Today’s Jrock band is Dir En Grey and their famous song- Child prey ~ Get Microsoft Silverlight

Cheers for reading, I’m Nu McAdam.

Or you can add me on Facebook~

http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=690460471&ref=tn_tnmn

 

 

A view with Nu / #1

Good or Bad?

Japanese music started off as a mixture of popular and distinct styles, from Classical, Folk and Traditional, originating from as early as the thirteenth century. The oldest forms of Traditional and Folk music in Japan are Buddhist Chanting, Orchestral Court music and Biwa hōshi (otherwise known as stories created by Lute performances.) Into the 1960’s the Japanese youth became very influenced by the modern rock genre, as a well-known modern rock band, The Beatles, who become internationally active in 1964. By the time the 80’s band ‘Japan’ appeared, Japan’s music industry was determined to show the western world their talents of making rock/punk culture internationally cultivating. Now in 2012, Japan is the second biggest music market in the world, behind the United States.

Jrock however, is a fairly new, popular choice by people from their teens to their twenties and here’s why!

 

 

 

This is Mana Sama, known and loved internationally from the band Moi Dix Mois. Now you may be thinking ‘My goodness he looks Pete Burns without the eye-patch’, which is what many people I showed this idol to said the first time. You may also be thinking he has taken the feminine gothic look that Dead or Alive one had and has simply put that in his own group. REMEMBER, these are biased opinions thatfellow friends, family, etc, have expressed.

 

Here’s a fan’s strongly worded reply to the subject on biased opinions towards Jrock. 

                                       

Rien Xi, 17, Birmingham
Common interests ~ Elegant Gothic Lolita & Aristocrat and Ouji fashion, Music (particularly Jrock and Classical), vampire, horror novels and tea!

“The people, who are quick to judge and insult Mana, obviously have no idea of the kind of person he is. Mana is an inspiration to thousands of people; he is a musician, an artist, the creator of a fashion and an intriguing human being with so much to offer to the world. Everything he does is inspiring, he has made a name for himself and has fans and followers all over the globe, so you may not like him, but you can’t deny the fact that he is talented. Those who talk badly of him because of the way he looks, without knowing anything about him, are obviously close-minded, simple and immature individuals. “Oh, he looks like Pete Burns.” Sure, maybe he does look like Pete Burns in your opinion… but what does that matter? Mana is beautiful and I feel sorry for those who can’t recognise that fact. He is an extraordinary person and he is clearly un-phased by hateful comments and opinions.  Even so, it’s quite pathetic to talk badly of somebody who looks different or is into something that you are not. It’s sad that people are still so close-minded and ignorant in this day and age.”

So many J-fans, as I call them, have participated in a wide variety of social events, such as; Gigs, Expos, Festivals and many gatherings discussing music, anime shows, fashion and most popularly the imaginative sexual stories between band members, aka ‘Fanservice’. A short while ago I was into this subculture and it took me on an extreme emotional adventure. When I had turned fourteen my gothic-cyber scene was abounded and I had found a new ‘alternative’ to become intrigued with and that was the commonly known Japanese street fashion Decora. I found out about the new exciting scene from my pen pal in China, whom herself was in high school and the same age as me. Of course due to our ridiculously random sense of humour, we clicked straight away and after 3 weeks were listening and fan-girling about the popular Jrock band ‘The Gazette’. From there I had changed my look on fashion, my future and which Japanese musician I had on my bedroom wall and had already booked a ticket to see my first live Jrock band – ‘Dio –distraught overlord-. On-top of being overly excited and screaming every 10 minutes before the gig in London, I was nervous beyond belief because of meeting a few people I knew but hadn’t met until that night. Thankfully, it all went well and to this day I still know those people who are now some of my closest friends including my boyfriend who I’ve been with for three years.  When I joined the queue outside the venue in Camden, I had heard rumours that people had camped outside for four days in the freezing cold in order to get right to the front of the stage, which until this day, I really didn’t see the point in. The whole night was fantastic, everyone really enjoyed themselves, so much so in fact, that some particularly obsessed fans were known to grope parts of the bands “private places” (yes, fans can get this horny in the pit)! It was all blood, sweat and tears when the gig was over as we were chanting for the band to come back on stage. But eventually they left, and I have to say, that was the most mad music experience of my life. Most Jrock gigs can get so wild that people get injured, mostly like metal gigs but with a lot more high-pitched screaming. But never fear, the security guards are always there to help (yeah, right). Unfortunately there are a lot of aspects about Jrock and Jfans that I don’t agree with. People often become so absorbed in the culture and its specific fashion that they take on a high school dynamic. People can get bitchy and arrogant, constantly passing judgment on any new people that don’t quite fit in with the strict unsaid rules, which from where I am is unheard of in metal gigs. And I ask you this, how do you think the band would feel if they found out about how their fans were promoting the gig experience?

Thankfully most people from the gig aren’t like that. Like i said, lots of them I’m still friends with and a lot of people agree with the problems that occur at gigs and gatherings, for instance my friend Keita who has been a lover of Jrock for over ten years –

 Keita-Eiri Uesugi, 22, Boston/Lincoln

Common interests: Kamijo, reading, writing and drawing.     

“For the past few years, I can quite safely say that Jrock has certainly been a big inspiration. I think, in some respects, it’s helped me to find out who I am and to not be afraid of stepping out of the box and being different; I can be myself and don’t have to feel I have to follow the crowd. Not only that, but it has helped to fuel my style of writing and the way that I draw as well and being a creative person, inspiration in the form of music is a pretty important thing. Good aspects of Jrock would have to be the appreciation that the whole songs get, from vocals, through the bass line and everything else in-between. I have found in the past, compared to western bands where the vocalist is the front man, the rest of the musicians seem to be ignored and bundled in the background… but with Jrock, it’s different. Also, there are so many styles within the Jmusic scene, that there literally is something to please everyone, whether it’s pop rock, symphonic metal and so on. Sadly, with all things, there is a downside. The level of competitiveness between fans cannot be denied and this often puts people off. Also, because the music is essentially sung in Japanese, this can course a lot of close minded people or none-listeners to turn their ears to what they do understand. “

 

 

On a lighter note though, Jrock music is a fantastic genre and has been widely recommended by such companies as Neo magazine, Kerrang and Moshi Moshi and of course, me. It has inspired me throughout the years to change my life and my career which is to work with the artist Hayao Miyazaki from Studio Ghibli.

 Today’s Jrock band is Dir En Grey and their famous song- Child prey

Thank you for reading, I’m Nu McAdam.