Peter 'Test Tube' Bywaters Deported from USA for impersonating Trump

  1. British punk singer Peter Bywaters 'deported from America for impersonating Donald Trump'

 

 

 
Paul 'H' Henrickson and Peter Bywaters

A British punk singer says he was deported from the US because he once impersonated Donald Trump on stage.

Peter Bywaters, of Peter & The Test Tube Babies, claims he was detained when he flew in for a festival.

He said he was interrogated for six hours by border control staff and shown photos of himself dressed up as Donald Trump on tour in Germany last year.

However according to the BBC, US Customs and Border Protection officials claim he was deported for having the wrong visa.

In a statement to EW, spokesman Jaime Ruiz said: "The claim that he was refused entry to the United States because he mocked the president of the United States, that is absolutely not true.

 

"That is false. The reason he was denied entry was because he came with the wrong visa."

After being questioned by customs and border staff in San Francisco, Peter Bywaters claims says he had his phone and passport confiscated, had a DNA swab taken, was photographed and had to make an official statement before being escorted to a plane bound for London.

He told the website Team Rock: "I had only been there 30 seconds when the border control guard swung his screen round and said, 'Is this you?'."

"There in full view was a video from last year's German tour with me dressed as Donald Trump smoking a fake joint.

"From there it all went downhill. Six hours later I was forcibly escorted to my seat on the plane."

He was refused alcohol on the 11-hour United Airlines flight back to the UK and only had his mobile and passport returned when he'd landed.

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"I expect to still be the singer of Peter & The Test Tube Babies by the end of the year," he said.

"Will Trump still be president by the end of the summer? A US tour or festival will never, ever happen again."

The rest of Peter & The Test Tube Babies performed at the Punk Invasion Festival in Orange County, California, with the help of several guest singers on Saturday - including Joey Bondage from Narcoleptic Youth, Ron Conflict from Lower Class Brats, Gabe Zander from Oi Scouts and Mike Blank from Blank 77.

The band, who formed in 1978 in East Sussex, release their new album in September.

Peter and the Test Tube Babies are one of the most popular UK based Punk bands worldwide, have performed constantly since the early 1980's gaining a global following. As a good friend of us at subcultz we find it very hard to believe that Peter would risk having the wrong visa for USA. The band perform across the globe regularly , and are well versed in the legalities involved in performing in USA. And the fact the rest of the band were allowed entry on the same visa, also backs up Peters story. He is not the first musician to have had the customs in USA flash up internet profiles of travelling musicians. 

Punk rock and British live music brings a huge boost to UK economy from tourism and music export, if Donald Trump feels he can curtail artistic expression and satire through his own vanity, this is a step into Americas murky past of the 1950's McCarthyism anti communist witch hunts, its even reported that Adolf Hitlers attitude toward Charlie Chaplin was one of secret humour

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How Fred Perry polos became the victim of lazy journalism

Wimbledon tennis champion Fred Perry

At far-right rallies across the U.S., an English tennis champion named Fred Perry hovers, invisible to the men unwittingly representing him. For the last two years, members of the Proud Boys cult of masculinity have worn Perry-branded striped-collar polo shirts with a Wimbledon-inspired laurel insignia as they shout at anti-fascist protesters and take rocks to the head. In blog posts and tweets dating back to 2014, their patriarch Gavin McInnes has instructed them that this — a Fred Perry cotton pique tennis shirt, always in black and yellow — is the proper armor for battling multiculturalism.

The Proud Boys at most have a few hundred active members, but they are a fixture at fascist “free speech” events like this month’s anti-Muslim marches, where they mingle with white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups. McInnes is eager to point out that the Proud Boys accept people of colour, Muslims, and Jewish people — so long as those members also “accept that the West is the best” and reject non-Western immigrants to America (McInnes is Canadian). But McInnes insists his followers are not themselves white supremacists, a clarification he has to make partially because Fred Perry polos have a history of popping up at any fashion orientated event across Europe and the Americas. The shirts have been a fixture in some form or another, in all their two-dozen-plus colorways, in modern and youth style for fifty years, here in the States but especially in England, where both the brand and the skinhead subculture that co-opted it are from.


Two young punk and mod teenagers in Woolwich, London in 1981.

                             Two young mods in Woolwich, London in 1981. PYMCA/UIG via Getty Images

Young skinheads wear Fred Perry at a gig in 1981.

Young skinheads wear Fred Perry at a gig in 1981. PYMCA/UIG via Getty Images

In the mid-1960s, a movement emerged, which was to become a god send for very cheap headlines, to sell newspapers and movies. when first-generation 'Black' Jamaican and Barbadian Brits, whose parents had been recruited by the tens of thousands to help rebuild England after WWII, introduced their white working-class friends to ska, rocksteady, and rude boy style at clubs around London’s council estates. “You could see the music was bringing these different cultures together, and it was suggesting a possible way forward through understanding our differences,” Don Letts, a filmmaker, DJ, and BBC Radio host, who was born in London in 1956 to Jamaican parents, told The Outline. In 2016 he produced the BBC documentary The Story of Skinhead, mostly to correct the record on skinhead culture’s non-racist origins. “Politics wasn’t really something that we talked about. That was on our parents’ level. We just wanted to bond over music, clothes, and girls.”Amid England’s entrenched class consciousness, taking pride in looking nice as a working-class person inspired the white English kids to spin together their own heritage with their West Indian neighbors’ sleek suits, dress shoes, and generally smart style. “They went for things that were associated with the English upper class and looked clean and sharp but were more affordable, and Fred Perry was definitely one of those things,” Letts said. Paired with work boots and tight jeans, Perry’s designs for the tennis court became a subversive dig at English elitism. The look, which according to Letts appeared mostly on white kids but a few black ones, too, was also a response to flamboyant, middle and upper-class mod culture;
before the term “skinhead” finally began appearing in the late ‘60s, the young white kids with short-cropped hair and crisp workwear were called hard mods.

As young people were working out this visual identity, white English adults had become convinced that black and South Asian immigrants were taking their jobs and ruining the economy. In 1968, conservative MP Enoch Powell delivered a now-infamous, vitriolic speech in which he warned white Brits that they would soon be an oppressed minority in their own country, punished by a politically correct government for daring to reject multiculturalism. “After that speech, I felt the atmosphere change immediately,” Letts said. “Race really came into the picture and the scene became more hostile.” a perfect subject matter could be stired up and encouraged, the press were onto something. a big group of young uneducated, poor working class kids, that could become the modern devil in the midst, The modern antichrist

The more ostracized and feared they were, the stronger their identity became.Skinhead culture began migrating north, to predominantly white communities, which at that time was 95% of the Britain, where football matches were the main source of distraction from a deteriorating economy on a Saturday afternoon. Fred Perry’s wide color range gave fans plenty of options to show which team they supported, and the look emanated a tough edge well suited to the violence simmering underneath football culture. Ensconced in white suburban bubbles, these boys became a natural target for the U.K. National Front, (just as much as they were by fleet street), a rapidly growing white nationalist party founded in 1967 that often recruited outside football stadiums. Every fresh college grad journalist had easy meat for the first published piece The party also opened social clubs across northern England that hosted live music, giving working-class kids — many of whom, proud of their class status, by then identified and dressed as skinheads — a place to congregate and commiserate about their dimming futures. “But you could only get in if you signed up to be a member of the National Front, and up north it was probably the only club, and so of course they wanted to go there and hear music,” Letts explained. “A lot of it came down to ignorance and just following the herd. These kids didn’t have any formulated political views.”

We discussed this story, and Gavin McInnes, on our daily podcast, The Outline World Dispatch. As the ’70s progressed, mainstream media became fascinated with this young, fashionable, seemingly new strain of the far right. The skinheads loved it; the more ostracized and feared they were, the stronger their identity became. Like today’s Pepe trolls, any attention was a godsend. Even when framed as reprehensible, ignorant ideology aired in public forums exposed more people to the journalist’ views and legitimized them as being worthy of discussion. After Margaret Thatcher brought the Tories’ isolationist, neoliberal policies to power in 1979, gutter journalism boomed across England, and there were always badly dressed college grads in the ranks twitching to bitch and lie for a quick buck down Fleet Street

Women wear Fred Perry at the annual Skinhead Reunion event in Brighton in 2014.

A picture taken and sold to a photo library, by a passing member of the public, looking for a quick earner, with no permission or knowledge of the girls personal lives or history

PYMCA/UIG via Getty Images

Malaysian skinheads attend a show in Kuala Lumpur in 2015.

Malaysian skinheads attend a show in Kuala Lumpur in 2015. Mohd Rasfan / Getty Images

With Reagan’s inauguration signaling a similar shift in the U.S., lazy journalism, and blatant blackening of characters of the lower wealth bracket became the norm, badly dressed press reporters uniform, boomed, to the levels of the padded shoulder suits, found a welcome home stateside when it landed in the early 1980s, according to Heidi Bierich, the director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project. “poor, white people ideas already had a toehold in the US, and this culture spread very quickly across the country,” said Bierich. In conservative strongholds like Orange County, California and in parts of northern Florida, angry white youth who were politically unwelcome amongst punk and hardcore’s overwhelming anti-Republicanism became a perfect victim of cheap lazy journalism, these uneducated, low paid mass were never going to make the media have to answer charges of malicious slander, character degredation, or incitement to abuse.

Zoe Beery , classic journalist style

Since the SPLC began tracking these journalists in the late 1990s, bad fashion sense has been a consistent enough presence that it’s one of only two things that really identifies these people. Number two, being their complete lack of factual evidence whilst concocting stories for the gaps between adverts in throwaway magazines clothing brands the SPLC includes in its lower class trash glossary is a fred perry t shirt (the other is Dr. Martens). “What makes youth fashion cultures distinct is music and clothing, not necessarily their ideology,” Bierich said. “They’re very mobile and fluid. You’ll find them in white black and hispanic groups in the USA,

 

A member of the Proud Boys wears Fred Perry at a rally in New York City.  London hipster wearing Fred Perry

A member of the Proud Boys stands behind Gavin McInnes in a black and yellow Fred Perry polo, at a rally in Berkeley, California.

A hispanic looking member of the Proud Boys wears Fred Perry at a rally in New York City. Andrew Lichtenstein / Getty Images

When I emailed McInnes to ask him why he tells his followers to wear the black and yellow polos as they trawl for anti-fascists in downtown hicksville, he warned me that “if you associate us with rich middle class pop stars, Hipsters, British sportsmen or any implication like that I will take you to court” but went on to explain that he wants to align his group with the working-class toughness of the late ’60s hard mods. (A youth culture that never actually existed ) “It plays into the idea of this being a rebellious, edgy movement against the status quo,” said Alice Marwick, an unnamed Fordham University researcher who has extensively studied social media (wasted months reading false facebook profiles) claiming to be far right. “When you say ‘white supremacy’ you think of something with a long history, like the KKK. When you say ‘alt-right’ it sounds like something new and alternative, very similar to alt delete, when you write something completely senseless. In that newness, people feel that they’re part of sticking it to the man, nothing like ending a debate, by pressing the block button, to silence any questions someone may want to ask the journalist.”

Amy Winehouse, Fred Perry

A few days later, he released a ten-minute video excoriating media that criticizes the Proud Boys for their uncanny similarities to Amy Winehouse dress sense. I asked him why, if he doesn’t want to be associated with Jewish singers, he tells the Proud Boys to dress like them. He replied, “I’m not going to let the media’s obsession with pop stars dictate what shirt we wear.” The more hated they are, the stronger their identity becomes.

This article has been written with slightly more knowledge than the original printed on new york toilet roll

if you want a laugh read here


Reggae on the Beach, 'Carry on up the Costa' 10-17th April 2018 (weekender party 13-14th) Costa Blanca

Coming soon Reggae on the Beach, 'Carry on up the Costa' 10-17th April Torrevieja, Spain

 

 

 

 

10th - 17th April 2018 Torrevieja, Costa Blanca, Spain

Nearest Airport Alicante or Murcia Spain

Event with 7 days accommodation including breakfast 2 people all inclusive

Event with 7 days accommodation including breakfast 3 people all inclusive

Event only Ticket £40

click for hotel details 

The venue and holiday complex

A week holiday in the sun with the very best DJ's playing the smooth sounds of Reggae, Soul and Ska, while you relax around the pool during the day, and dance the night away in the evening. A perfect paradise sandy beach, with warm Mediteranean waters within a 5 minute walk. In Southern Spain.

64 Cabins are available, that sleep up to 3 people, bookings for a week, with a 2 night full late night event over  the weekend of 13-14th April, with pool games, and music throughout your week. This is a family friendly event. All hotel amenities onsite, including a restaurant.

email subcultz@gmail.com for further information

Read more


Out of Order (Montreal Oi! band)

Performing live at The Great Skinhead Reunion, Brighton 2nd June 2017

Out of Order was formed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 2001, they landed their first gig in Halifax's seediest and most infamous punk dives, Hell. Over the next several years, the band jammed and slugged out a few impromptu shows in Halifax.

After founding members moved to Montreal, they played their first gig in the new city at L'Hemisphere Gauche in 2006. Over the next couple years, the first Out of Order demos were released and a full length album was pumped out. Recorded in the bowels of St. Henri's Fattal building, the album entitled simply "Out Of Order" was a raw and vicious sounding record in the spirit of the true D.I.Y ethic.

The band began touring around Canada in late 2008 smashing out show after show all over Quebec, Ontario and the East Coast of Canada.

In the summer of 2010 the band went into the Studio to record “Written on the Walls”, a 14 track album which was released later in 2011 by the band themselves. However, during the 2012 Pouzza Fest, a riot prevented Out of Order from taking the stage and signalled the end of the band.

In 2013, Out of Order found itself not only back but stronger than ever. Joel Bellemare's technical rock-and-roll leads and solos are fortified with the blitz of bassist Yves Thibault's rhythm lines, strengthened further by Mitch Cayouette steady rythum gituar. Vocalist, Scott Maracle's guttural vocals still constantly season the whole mix, while drummer Jean-Luc Bilodeau brings up the rear with a fast paced thumping and peppered beats on the drums. Together, Out Of Order aims to redefine what it means to be a rocker. They spent a year and a half in the studio recording their album “Better Days” which was be released in July 2014. The band embarked on a tour of the Midwestern and Eastern USA and Europe in the summer of 2014 and 2015. In 2016 Out of Order embarked on a full whirlwind North American tour of Canada and the U.S.A, 22 cities in 25 days. The bands 3rd studio release, 'Stuck in the Mud" is due out by Christmas of 2016. Between the stage antics which have often left Scott bruised and bloody after shows and the fire of five dedicated musicians ready to make any crowd get their riot on. Out of Order is a band you don’t want to miss.

Members:

Scott Maracle (lead vocals)
Joel Bellemare (guitar, backing vocals)
Mitch Cayouette (rythum guitar, backing vocals)
Jean-Luc Bilodeau (drums)
Yves Thibault (Bass, backing vocals)

Discography

2008: Out of Order demo
2011: Written On The Walls (full length)
2014: Dog Bite (7” split with Gag Order)
2014: Better Days (full length)
2016: Stuck in the Mud (full length)

Tours and Shows

2016 Stuck in the Mud Tour: Toronto, Kalamazoo, Chicago, St. Louis, Tulsa, Denver, Las Vegas, Hollywood, Pomona, Long Beach, San Jose, Portland, Seattle, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Philadelphia, New York, Rutland, Montreal

2015 Europe: France, Italy, Switzerland, Germany

2014 Canada / United States: Montreal, Toronto, Branford, New York, Brooklyn, Detroit, Chicago, Indianapolis , St. Louis, Memphis, Nashville, Pittsburgh,

2010-2013 Canada / United States: Montreal, Trois-Rivieres, Toronto, New York, New Jersey, Brooklyn, Detroit, Milwaukee, Chicago, Halifax, Fredricton, PEI,

Festivals: 2009 Varning Fest (Montreal) 2011-2013 Pouzza Fest (Montreal), 2013 Oi Saint Patricks Day Weekend Fest (Montreal) 2013 Buckfest 12 (Montreal) 2013 Beer City Bender Punk Oi Fest (Milwaukee), 2013 Terminal City Ricochet (Toronto), Mid West Live & Loud 2015 (Milwaukee) , Endless Summer Fest (Torgau, Germany)

Bands shared the stage with: The Brains, The Misfits, Dayglo Abortions, Bishops Green, The Vibrators, Gag Order, King Size Braces, Bad Assets, Metalian, Vuglar Deli, The Traditionals, Slapshot, Brass Tacks,Madball, Discipline, Bad Co. Project, Infa-Riot, Special Duties, Funeral Dress, Legion 76, Bad Engrish, DDC, The Strike, Lionheart and many more

Description
High energy anthem driven crossover of punk rock and oi music!

Artists We Also Like
Oxymoron, One Way System, Blitz..and on and on and on.

Thanks a lot!
Look forward to hearing more from you.
Scott
www.outofordercanada.comOut of Order was formed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 2001, they landed their first gig in Halifax's seediest and most infamous punk dives, Hell. Over the next several years, the band jammed and slugged out a few impromptu shows in Halifax.

After founding members moved to Montreal, they played their first gig in the new city at L'Hemisphere Gauche in 2006. Over the next couple years, the first Out of Order demos were released and a full length album was pumped out. Recorded in the bowels of St. Henri's Fattal building, the album entitled simply "Out Of Order" was a raw and vicious sounding record in the spirit of the true D.I.Y ethic.

The band began touring around Canada in late 2008 smashing out show after show all over Quebec, Ontario and the East Coast of Canada.

In the summer of 2010 the band went into the Studio to record “Written on the Walls”, a 14 track album which was released later in 2011 by the band themselves. However, during the 2012 Pouzza Fest, a riot prevented Out of Order from taking the stage and signalled the end of the band.

In 2013, Out of Order found itself not only back but stronger than ever. Joel Bellemare's technical rock-and-roll leads and solos are fortified with the blitz of bassist Yves Thibault's rhythm lines, strengthened further by Mitch Cayouette steady rythum gituar. Vocalist, Scott Maracle's guttural vocals still constantly season the whole mix, while drummer Jean-Luc Bilodeau brings up the rear with a fast paced thumping and peppered beats on the drums. Together, Out Of Order aims to redefine what it means to be a rocker. They spent a year and a half in the studio recording their album “Better Days” which was be released in July 2014. The band embarked on a tour of the Midwestern and Eastern USA and Europe in the summer of 2014 and 2015. In 2016 Out of Order embarked on a full whirlwind North American tour of Canada and the U.S.A, 22 cities in 25 days. The bands 3rd studio release, 'Stuck in the Mud" is due out by Christmas of 2016. Between the stage antics which have often left Scott bruised and bloody after shows and the fire of five dedicated musicians ready to make any crowd get their riot on. Out of Order is a band you don’t want to miss.

Members:

Scott Maracle (lead vocals)
Joel Bellemare (guitar, backing vocals)
Mitch Cayouette (rythum guitar, backing vocals)
Jean-Luc Bilodeau (drums)
Yves Thibault (Bass, backing vocals)

Discography

2008: Out of Order demo
2011: Written On The Walls (full length)
2014: Dog Bite (7” split with Gag Order)
2014: Better Days (full length)
2016: Stuck in the Mud (full length)

Tours and Shows

2016 Stuck in the Mud Tour: Toronto, Kalamazoo, Chicago, St. Louis, Tulsa, Denver, Las Vegas, Hollywood, Pomona, Long Beach, San Jose, Portland, Seattle, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Regina, Winnipeg, Ottawa, Philadelphia, New York, Rutland, Montreal

2015 Europe: France, Italy, Switzerland, Germany

2014 Canada / United States: Montreal, Toronto, Branford, New York, Brooklyn, Detroit, Chicago, Indianapolis , St. Louis, Memphis, Nashville, Pittsburgh,

2010-2013 Canada / United States: Montreal, Trois-Rivieres, Toronto, New York, New Jersey, Brooklyn, Detroit, Milwaukee, Chicago, Halifax, Fredricton, PEI,

Festivals: 2009 Varning Fest (Montreal) 2011-2013 Pouzza Fest (Montreal), 2013 Oi Saint Patricks Day Weekend Fest (Montreal) 2013 Buckfest 12 (Montreal) 2013 Beer City Bender Punk Oi Fest (Milwaukee), 2013 Terminal City Ricochet (Toronto), Mid West Live & Loud 2015 (Milwaukee) , Endless Summer Fest (Torgau, Germany)

Bands shared the stage with: The Brains, The Misfits, Dayglo Abortions, Bishops Green, The Vibrators, Gag Order, King Size Braces, Bad Assets, Metalian, Vuglar Deli, The Traditionals, Slapshot, Brass Tacks,Madball, Discipline, Bad Co. Project, Infa-Riot, Special Duties, Funeral Dress, Legion 76, Bad Engrish, DDC, The Strike, Lionheart and many more

Description
High energy anthem driven crossover of punk rock and oi music!

Artists We Also Like
Oxymoron, One Way System, Blitz..and on and on and on.

Thanks a lot!
Look forward to hearing more from you.
Scott
www.outofordercanada.com


Ivy League Japan 1964

The Miyuki-zoku: Japan’s First Ivy Rebels

The first Japanese to adopt elements of the Ivy League Look were a youth tribe called the Miyuki-zoku, who suddenly appeared in the summer of 1964. The group’s name came from their storefront loitering on Miyuki Street in the upscale Ginza shopping neighborhood (the suffix “zoku” means subculture or social group). The Miyuki-zoku were mostly in their late teens, a mix of guys and girls, likely numbering around 700 at the trend’s peak. Since they were students, they would arrive in Ginza wearing school uniforms and have to change in to their trendy duds in cramped café bathrooms.

And what duds they were. The Miyuki-zoku were devotees of classic American collegiate style. The uniform was button-down oxford cloth shirts, madras plaid, high-water trousers in khaki and white, penny loafers, and three-button suit jackets. Everything was extremely slim. The guys wore their hair in an exact seven-three part, which was new for Japan. They were also famous for carrying around their school uniforms inside of rolled-up brown paper grocery bags.

What lead to the sudden arrival of the Miyuki-zoku? Although Japanese teens had been looking to America since 1945 for style inspiration, these particular youth were not copying Princeton or Columbia students directly. In fact, Japanese kids at this time rarely got a chance to see Americans other than the ever-present US soldiers.

The Miyuki-zoku had found the Ivy look through a new magazine called Heibon Punch. The periodical was targeted to Japan’s growing number of wealthy urban youth, and part of its editorial mission was to tell kids how to dress. The editors advocated the Ivy League Look, which at the time was basically only available in the form of domestic brand VAN. Kensuke Ishizu of VAN had discovered the look in the 1950s and pushed it as an alternative to the slightly thuggish big-shouldered, high-waisted, mismatched jacket-and-pants look that dominated Japanese men’s style throughout the 1950s. As an imported look, Ivy League fashion felt cutting-edge and sophisticated to Tokyo teens, and this fit perfectly with Heibon Punch‘s mission of giving Baby Boomers a style of their own.

When the magazine arrived in the spring 1964, readers all went out and became Ivy adherents. Parents and authorities, however, were hardly thrilled with a youth tribe of American style enthusiasts. The first strike against the Miyuki-zoku is that the guys — gasp! — would blow dry their hair. This was seen as a patently feminine thing to do.

More critically, the Miyuki-zoku picked the wrong summer to hang out in Ginza. Japan was preparing for the 1964 Olympics, which would commence in October. Tokyo was in the process of removing every last eyesore — wooden garbage cans, street trolleys, the homeless — anything that would possibly be offending to foreign visitors. The Olympics was not just a sports event, but would be Japan’s return into the global community after its ignoble defeat of World War II, and nothing could go wrong.

So authorities lay awake at night with the fear that foreigners would come to Japan and see kids in tight high-water pants hanging out in front of prestigious Ginza stores. Neighborhood leaders desperately wanted to eradicate the Miyuki-zoku before October, so they went to Ishizu of VAN and asked him to intervene. VAN organized a “Big Ivy Style Meet-up” at Yamaha Hall, and cops helped put 200 posters across Ginza to make sure the Miyuki-zoku showed up. Anyone who came to the event got a free VAN bag — which was the bag for storing your normal clothing during loitering hours. They expected 300 kids, but 2,000 showed up. Ishizu gave the keynote address, where he told everyone to knock it off with the lounging in Ginza. Most acquiesced, but not all.

So on September 19, 1964, a huge police force stormed Ginza and hauled off 200 kids in madras plaid and penny loafers. Eighty-five were processed at nearby Tsukiji jail. The kids got the message and never came back, and that was the end of the Miyuki-zoku.

Starting in 1945, Japanese authorities generally viewed all Western youth fashion as a delinquent subculture. Despite looking relatively conservative in style compared to the other biker gangs and greasy-haired rebels, the Miyuki-zoku were still caught up in this delinquent narrative. In fact, they were actually the first middle-class youth consumers buying things under the direction of the mainstream media. It was Japanese society that was simply not ready for the idea that youth fashion could be part of the marketplace.

After the Miyuki-zoku, however, Ivy became the de facto look for fashionable Japanese men, and the “Ivy Tribe” that followed faced little of the harassment seen by its predecessor. The Miyuki-zoku may have lost the battle of Ginza, but they won the war for Ivy League style. — W. DAVID MARX

As the Ivy League style swept across the globe. The British Modernist 'Mods' subculture adopted the clothing, modifying it into a very British subculture, with a new more aggressive edge. The Skinheads

Bracknell Skinheads 1970

 

W. David Marx is a writer living in Tokyo whose work has appeared in GQ, Brutus, Nylon, and Best Music Writing 2009, among other publications. He is currently Tokyo City Editor of CNNGo and Chief Editor of web journal Néojaponisme.

 


Dakka Skanks Confirmed for the Great Skinhead Reunion, Brighton

Brand new top quality Ska Rock steady band Dakka Skanks confirmed for The Great Skinhead Reunion Brighton

Dakka Skanks are a 5-piece Ska/Dub/Reggae band based in Brighton. Combining catchy choruses, up-tempo riffs and dubby breakdowns, they set out to rejuvenate a classic British sound - maintaining the iconic Ska vibe whilst seamlessly integrating elements of Dub, Reggae and Drum & Bass, to create a modern twist on an old favourite.


No Hopes, Berlin (Punk band)

No Hopes is a punk rock band formed in 2015 in Berlin. The band was founded by Checka (vocals) and some members, which were changing very fast during the year. In 2016 the band found its stability with Celia (bass), Fede (drums) and Josef (guitar). The members were playing in such bands as Street Criminals,Hangover Generation, Kötter and all coming from different countries, though chose Berlin as a place to live, with its vibrant Punk underground scene.
On the summer 2016 band played first shows in Germany and a mini tour in Netherlands and Belgium.
The music is aggressive, but melodic punk, with a slight touch of rock'n'roll influence, fronted with strong female vocals.
"No Hopes" as a name is not heading to some depressive thematic, but disclaims that there is no use for hopes, when there is no action. So the topics of the songs are mostly about taking responsibility of your own life,choosing the way and standing for it, politics reflected on the life of people and sometimes about a good big party, which always goes hand in hand with a well done show.

This is a band that will do well in the modern European scene, good energy, genuine punk with a message

A really good solid punk rock sound, fronted by the beautiful Checka Cecchini, A band we will be keeping an eye on

Take a Listen Here

 

Upcoming gig at Cortina bob Berlin


Tear Up, Playground Politics Album release Now Available on Subcultz

The first album by Tear up will be the first official release from Subcultz records. One of the UK best new Oi! bands that have literally been tearing up the British scene over the last year. And now its been recorded. Please support the band and the scene by placing your order now. Official release gig will be part of the Great Skinhead Reunion Brighton weekend, where the band will be performing the album, meeting and greeting. Its your support that keeps the scene alive! ORDER HERE

Playground politics

King of the car park

Fuck boy

Dead beat dad

Jimmy Saville's greenhouse

Bollocks to the smoking ban

Not big not clever

This is england

Dodgy dave

One of the faces

Binge drink britain


Micky Fitz. A Legend of OI! RIP

micky-fitz

Where do i start with Micky Fitz?

Well i guess at the beginning. and for me it takes me back to a wild squat party in Brixton 1981, a few weeks after the riots.We had met some of the south London skins around London and had been invited to a skinhead party, it was in a big 4 storey townhouse squat on Coldharbour Lane. Chalky, Kev and Nigel. The only Brixton skinheads still in the area, as the racial violence, NF etc was at its height, a very dangerous place for any young skinhead to venture. But being the little shits with attitude we were, nothing like a death threat was going to stand in our way. As we entered the squat, Kev stood at the door, and told every skinhead, no seig heiling. that seemed to be the only rule of the night.

Someone had got hold of a brand new record called Harry May, this was South London Skinhead music at its best, by their band called The Business. it was played all night long on repeat. the skinhead world then, was very different than today. it was based on violence, it was anti authority. And of course that night was to be no different. halfway through the evening the music was dramatically turned off. Everyone leaning towards the windows, to see a huge black mob in the street, we were in their manor. Being a kid of 16, it was one of those days that i thought i wouldnt be reaching my next birthday. but the lads at the party were well aquainted with this sort of situation, these were the real hardcore firms of the time, many living on the streets. Weapons appeared from nowhere, knives, machetes, brass knuckles. one bloke even had a bowling pin, he leaned out the window holding it. Looking downstairs, there were already a mob of skinheads in the garden in a standoff. vastly outnumbered, the skinheads stood their ground. The black mob soon realising, this would be a savage fight. A peace treaty was quickly declared, and the blacks melted into the night.

The party went on through the night. it made a huge impact on me, i met some of the best people of my life. the South London Skinheads. East London was getting plenty of press, but the other mobs were fierce. there were some right toe rags at the party, even mad jocks boys were there. skinheads with tattooed faces, most people covered in black eyes and bruises. There was no police presence in the area, skinhead events were always self policed, and held together by loyalty and respect. Being Wycombe boys, my mate and me werent known by anyone, but openly welcomed. i even managed to get hold of a beautiful skinhead girl that night. Who after we had done our business, and then after the blacks had gone, i noticed her standing down in the garden with a skinhead bloke. i asked chalky who the skinhead was. he replied 'her boyfriend!' ffs i had survived immenent death through a potential petrol bombed house, to have some crazy looking (and older) skinhead with peanut tattooed on his head, and his 'Girlfriend !!

But a short while later, Peanut just walked in the room and said 'alright mate' and smiled...

Harry May takes me back to that night, every time i hear it.

A few years later, i had grown up a bit, some of the best Oi! gigs i ever attended were held at a little club beside the railway in kensington, The Adlib. Very few venues did more than one oi! gig, as usually they turned into a wild west bar fight, quite often between South and East london skinheads,sometimes opposing football firms, but generally just because someone got a beer spilled, or a bird got her arse pinched. But that night at the Adlib, i noticed this big tall bloke throwing things into the crowd. As everyone was pogoing to the Business. A skinhead nudged me and pointed. 'You seen that cunt!' It was good enough excuse for me, we went straight at him. the other skinhead got sucked into the mosh, but i got hold of the big geezer and went to work on him. the next thing i know i am bouncing his head off of the stage. then as i come out of the red mist i could hear 'Oi leave it out, leave it out' i look up and standing above me was Micky fitz, and he was pointing at me. As i relaxed, the crowd just grabbed me, as Micky let lose into another business classic.

An example of how this guy held fort, how he controlled a room, how in the wild days of skinhead and oi! some characters stood larger than life. Micky had the courage to stand on a stage in front of warring savage skinheads. yet everyone in the room , had full respect for that man.

Unlike some of the other Oi! frontmen, who were often members of football hooligan, or Skinhead gangs, Micky wasn't known as a violent bloke, but more a good mate, a real salt of the Earth, someone that stood by his beliefs and put that into music. which was so apparent throughout his whole life.

In recent years, after the self destuction of the London skinhead scene in the late 80's many bands threw the towell in. the divides, political antagonism, manipulation and Maggie thatcher smashed us to a pulp. times changed, life moved on...

But not for micky, not for a small but determined few bands, that took Oi! into Europe, that became street punk. the bands that kept the flag flying, for those of us that held that love in our hearts, these were the life blood. The USA and across the world a new audience picked up on our music. Bands like The Business stayed on the road. fighting all the way, times had changed, i guess those songs to some are a nice tune that gets the blood pumping, songs of a time we lived in the Cities of England, during the Thatcher years, the disenfranchised youth. The working class heroes. Micky put those feelings into songs, he gave us a pride, a sense of worth. We did riot and sometimes work as well.

When we started the Great Skinhead Reunion in Brighton, i was so pleased that micky had come down for the social with the West Ham lads and his wife. He wasnt performing, but it proved once again this man was still one of us. He was still an old skinhead, just like us. Since 2011 Micky and i spoke alot about him performing, as the reunion has grown year on year, but unfortunately he kept getting USA tours and other stuff, which made it hard for him to make a firm commitment, some bands have agents, and large European Punk festivals have better resources, and i would never expect any band to drop a big event, to play for us. i saw him regularily whenever i went up to blackpool or in Europe, and he would always make a B line to come talk with me, always a really decent bloke, we talked alot about his fight with alcahol addiction, which had turned into a shopping addiction hah. But then he was struck by this evil desease, and in true Fitzy style, he made no fuss about it, he didnt want big charity events or any noise made. He took the fight on straight in its face.

Together with his band, they wrote and performed songs, which were our heart, our feelings, our life. The Real enemy, Suburban Rebels, Blind Justice.. and as i write this i am not ashamed to say i have a tear in my eye, thinking of Another Rebel Dead.

God Love you Micky, your songs took me through hell and back. I never thanked you for that in life, but i will never forget you in death.

 

Symond Lawes

Wycombe Skinheads


Mid-80s London Jazz Dance scene

  1. Joe Davis was part of the mid-80s London Jazz Dance scene, holding down a residency at The WAG and hanging out with legends like Paul Murphy and Gilles Peterson. He is probably most famous for being THE man that travelled to Brazil in search of records and brought that vinyl back, effectively birthing a London boom in all things Brazilian. Once he had exhausted Brazil`s treasure trove of dusty basements, Joe started Far Out Recordings in 1994 to focus on and promote new music coming out of the country. With the label currently celebrating its 20th year we conducted a lengthy interview with Joe. Part 1 concentrates on those Jazz Dance days of The Wag and Electric Ballroom.

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EU Ban 2 Stroke vehicles. January 2017

 All two strokes, including scooters, to be banned from 1st of January 2017
 

Following on from a recent directive from the EU commission, that all two stroke motorcycles and scooters were being phased out due to their emissions and fuel economy.
Many motorcycle and scooter developers have already phased out their 2 stroke engine in favour of the modern built 4 stroke and have spent many thousands of pounds developing these to attain the right readings etc.

However, what was never stated until recently was what would happen to the many classic Motorcycles and scooters that are already owned and maintained by enthusiasts. Initially it was said by the EU that they would not be affected and owners can continue to run them until they finally are unable to rebuild them or keep them running. This was thought to be a solution to allow natural phase out of this type of engine, as stock parts would be limited as the years progressed.

However it seems that the ingenuity of owners of these machines, means that this would actually take longer than was originally thought. Many owners are competent mechanics and engineers and those that aren't, know someone who is and who can help. This has made the EU commision realise that they need to bring in a new directive to stop this happening, and have had lengthy meetings with Chris Grayling, Theresa May's current Secretary of state for Transport.

Mr Grayling is on record as saying " These prehistoric motors are causing issues with pollution and damaging wildlife's habitat. We recently bought in a tax to stop pollution within london, and it's now time that we looked at reducing this further by banning these machines completely. Therefore from 1st January 2017, all 2 stroke motorcycles and scooters will be banned from the British and European roads, and all owners of two stroke vehicles will be contacted and asked to scrap their vehicle with immediate effect"

Our reporter spoke to an owner who wished to remain nameless, but who is a member of a scooter riders association and refers to himself as a Garagista.
He said "Once again we have to face another fight to keep our pride and joys alive and on the road. This won't happen as long as we can fight this like we did with the greasers in the 1960's, and the Casuals in the 1980's. If the EU wants a fight, tell them Brighton seafront 1st January 2017, and to bring their mates"

The EU commission were unavailable for a direct quote when we put this to them, but have since released a statement regarding the 1st of January offer. It says " The EU does not, and will not resort to fist fighting on a beach in southern England on the 1 st of any month, let alone January when the temperatures are at a low. Besides we very much doubt that the owners of these machines would turn up, due to their love of alcohol and a party on the 31st of December every year"

A spokesman for the Skinhead subculture says " Although we have had an on off relationship with Mods over the years, many Skinheads do infact ride vintage scooters to events all over Britain on most summer weekends. Some even using them on a daily bases. They are a great way to escape the wife, and keep fit, as they are generally pushed for half of their daily journey, we dont think the Mods are hard enough to handle any EU row, without us, so if you can pass this message on to the EU, that a united British firm will be waiting, the first weekend of June, Brighton beach. The sun may have set on the empire, but the spirit remains in the few, United we stand" 

UKIP EU MEP Nigel Farage has stepped in and agreed to look into this matter, stating " This won't happen on my watch. This is a British way of life that has been around for 50 years, and the revenue that these riders bring to coastal resorts throughout the summer far outways the damage a few minor scuffles between Mods and Rockers may cause, leave this with me"


Skinheads BBC, Don Letts

 

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Skinheads. Don Letts documentary. BBC

When I first received an email from the BBC asking would I like to be involved in a documentary that BBC4 were putting together with Don Letts, my first thought was one of caution, I have done a few documentaries over the years, starting with George Marshall in 1994, Then Skinhead attitude of 2002. The first documentary I remember being made was the 40 minutes, focussing on the band Combat 84 and chubby Chris, which was a complete stitch up, and ruined the bands career, making them being excluded from the forthcoming Oi! Albums and finding their records banned.

The media will always have an agenda, usually one based on other media perceptions on Skinhead racialist politics. So I thought to myself, do I really want to go and tell this terminally boring story once again, but then I thought, well if I don't, someone else will. Its been a curse for nearly 40 years, since the far right National Front in the UK actively set up a recruitment campaign, targeting disenfranchised white working class kids, provoking and promoting violence and faction. The Skinhead image perfect for the Sun Newspaper to run front page images of the modern devil in our midst. Like any young kid, wanting to be part of something, many jumped onto that image and the wheels have turned ever since, one feeding the other.

I decided to go meet up with Don and get his story, find out his motivation in his desire to make a documentary. Was it going to be the usual media left wing leaning clap trap. But very soon Don and I started having a laugh, we shared many life experiences and times. Although he is slightly older than me, we were both involved in riots in 1981, both loved punk rock. I had booked Don in 2007 to DJ our Xray Spex show at the Roundhouse, as he was the legendary Roxy club Dj and a friend of Poly Styrene.barry-bmore-george-don-letts-symond-lawes-bbc-skinhead-documentary

Before we started talking Skinhead, Don produced some old tattered photos of himself in the late 60's as a skinhead, stapress, loafers and button down shirt. Then told me his own story of growing up on a south London council estate, and the early pre punk skinhead days. And that his motivation was to put the record straight, and celebrate the strongest youth subculture to have ever been born in England. Its rich tapestry, that has weaved the threads of Skinhead from the mid 60's to the mid 2010's.

I agreed to take part, and roped my old mate from the Wycombe Skinheads, Barry 'Bmore' George along. I did put several names forward to the researchers, as people I told them held respect through action in the skinhead world. People like Gary Hodges, Milky, Roy Ellis. They told me they had been speaking to Roi Pearce and Suggs, so I thought it would be great to have some of these king pins of the scene involved, but sadly most people in our scene distrust the media more than rabid dogs, which after all these years, and stitch ups, is understandable. I even find it a struggle with some bands that are very happy to play large 'Punk' festivals to a skinhead audience, but don't want to appear on a flyer for a 'Skinhead Reunion' So its a problem on all levels. Until everyone involved claims the Skinhead subculture, and puts their truth forward, the subculture will forever be that of the medias perception. As a kid of 13 I made a vow to become a skinhead, and through lifes journey, its a belief and core I have never felt any embarrassment over. Guilt through association.. well I know who I am, and who my skinhead friends are. So what the media and the middle class think of me, I wont be losing sleep over.

I found the documentary to be surprisingly good. It started with the roots of skinhead. The Reggae and Jamaican influences of its inception in the 60's. The football hooligan gang fighting of the 70-80's. The influence created by Joe Pearce and the Young national Fronts campaign. The musical icons like Jimmy Pursey. The 2tone explosion of 1979. Some old footage of Ian Stuart. Live interviews with Kevin Rowland and Pauline Black, to give quite a good balance, and explain the why's and wherefores of the British Skinhead subculture.

Sure if I had been given the job of researcher and assistant director, I would have added more elements in. The music and what it meant to us, on a street level, the offshoots like the scooter and northern soul scene. Perhaps tried to get people involved in the far right skinhead scene to explain from their angle, why they felt the way they did, and how they feel its part of the skinhead culture they have lived. Don had voices of the far left, with Roddy Mareno. Might have even been nice to find a journalist that would admit to paying young kids for a seig heil for the newspapers.

But what the documentary really did for me, was to show I am not the only person with such a strong passion for our beloved Skinhead subculture. I saw many faces on the screen I consider friends, brothers and sisters. So many of them singing from the same hymn sheet. And that is, there is only one skinhead subculture and its called SKINHEAD

watch it here 

Symond Lawes.

23 Oct 2016


Jeff Turner and Gary Bushell on Oi!

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The Cockney Rejects' 1980 performance at Birmingham's Cedar Club remains unnoted in the annals of rock history. It warrants no mention when music journalists compile the 100 Most Shocking Moments in Rock, nor the 100 Craziest Gigs Ever, which seems like a terrible oversight. In fairness, no one is ever going to rank the show by the East End quartet – then enjoying chart success with a punk take on the West Ham terrace anthem I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles – alongside Jimi Hendrix at Monterey in terms of musical brilliance. Still, it has its own claim to historical import: by all accounts, it was the most violent gig in British history.

"I'd seen quite a bit on the terraces or outside football grounds, but this was carnage," says Jeff Turner, today an immensely amiable decorator, then "Stinky" Turner, the Cockney Rejects' teenage frontman, cursed with what his former manager Garry Bushell tactfully describes as "a bit of a temper". Turner continues: "There was a lot of people cut and hurt, I got cut, my brother [Rejects' guitarist Micky Geggus] really got done bad, with an ashtray, the gear was decimated, there was people lying around on the floor. Carnage."

The problem was football-related. "Most of the punk bands at the time, they had their ideals – the Clash, Career Opportunities, political stuff, fair play," says Turner. "When I was a kid, my thought for punk rock was that it could put West Ham on the front pages." To this end, the band – affiliated to the club's hooligans in the Inter City Firm – had appeared on Top of the Pops in West Ham shirts. "After that, everybody wanted to fight us, but you couldn't back down," says Turner. "Once you were defeated, it would have opened the floodgates for everybody."

So the Rejects and their party fought: "Twenty Cockneys against … well, not all 300 Brummies were trying to attack us, but I'd say we were trying to fight off 50 to 100 people." In the aftermath, Micky Geggus was charged with GBH and affray, and the Cockney Rejects' career as a live band was, in effect, over. An attempt to play Liverpool later that year ended after six songs "because there was 150 Scousers trying to kill us", while a subsequent gig in Birmingham was aborted by the police: "The old bill got wind of it and escorted us on to the M6," says Turner. "At the time, I was gutted, but now, I think, thank God for that. Someone could have died."

Perhaps it's unsurprising the gig has been swept under the carpet of musical history: after all, so has the genre the Cockney Rejects inadvertently inspired. Thirty years after Bushell – then a writer for the music paper Sounds, as well as the Rejects' manager – coined the term "Oi!" to describe a third generation of punk-inspired working-class bands playing "harder music on every level, guitar driven, terrace choruses", it remains largely reviled or ignored in Britain.

In the eyes of its remaining fans, Oi! is the "real thing", the genuine sound of Britain's streets in the late 70s, populated by artists Bushell championed when the rest of the music press concentrated on "bands who dropped literary references you wouldn't have got if you didn't have a masters' degree and wrote pretentious lyrics". Bands such as the Cockney Rejects, the Angelic Upstarts – Marxists from South Shields managed by a man Bushell colourfully describes as "a psychopath – his house had bars over all the windows because people had thrown firebombs through it" – Red Alert, Peter and the Test Tube Babies. It briefly stormed the charts. The Angelic Upstarts followed the Cockney Rejects onto Top of the Pops, while Splodgenessabounds made the Top 10 with the deathless Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps Please. But today, if the general public have heard of it at all, they tend to agree with the assessment once offered by journalist and broadcaster Stuart Maconie: "Punk's stunted idiot half-brother, musically primitive and politically unsavoury, with its close links to far-right groups." It is, asserts Bushell, "without a doubt, the most misunderstood genre in history".

cockney-rejects-greatest-cockney-ripoffThe problem isn't really to do with the music, although protracted exposure to the oeuvre of Peter and the Test Tube Babies – home to Student Wankers, Up Yer Bum and Pick Your Nose (and Eat It) – could leave all but the hardiest soul pleading tearfully for a few literary references and pretentious lyrics. The problem is Oi!'s adoption by the far-right as its soundtrack of choice. It wasn't the only part of street culture to attract the attentions of the National Front and the British Movement in the late 70s and early 80s. Losing out at the polling stations thanks to the rise of Margaret Thatcher, the NF had instigated a programme of "direct action": it would attempt to kick its way into the headlines at football matches and gigs. Chart bands such as Sham 69, Madness and the Specials had concerts disrupted.In 1978, seig-heiling skinheads caused £7,500 worth of damage at a Sham 69 gig in London.

But it was to Oi! that the far-right was most attracted, not least because it attracted both football hooligans and the re-emergent skinhead movement – two groups the NF's direct-action programme targeted for recruitment. "We played a gig in Camden, we saw these Nazi skinheads beating the shit out of these two punks," remembers Turner. "They'd managed to wreck Sham 69's career, but us with our following" – the ICF was then headed by Cass Pennant, whose parents were Jamaican – "we weren't going to have it. We just went down and absolutely slaughtered them. We declared to them that if they ever set foot where we were again, we'd decimate them." And so it proved. "Neo-nazis confronted the Rejects again at Barking station," remembers Bushell. "They basically told them, 'We're going to come to your gigs, we're going to do this and do that.' The Rejects crew battered them all over the station. They didn't come to the gigs after that."

Bushell points out that there was "a Nazi subculture all the way through punk. Malcolm McLaren started it all with the swastikas, which thick people saw and thought, 'Oh, they must be Nazis.'" There were white power punk bands, too – such as the Dentists and the Ventz, which were formed by the "Punk Front" division of the National Front, in lieu of real punk bands showing any interest in promoting white supremacy. It was a trick the NF would be forced to pull again when Oi! bands resisted their overtures – the party recruited a failed punk band from Blackpool called Skrewdriver and repositioned them as the musical voice of the neo-Nazi movement. "It was totally distinct from us," says Bushell. "We had no overlap other than a mutual dislike for each other."

strength-thru-oi-poster-gavin-watson

Bushell's latterday career as a gleeful provoker of the liberal left, writing for the Sun and the Daily Star, probably hasn't done much to help public perceptions regarding Oi!'s political affiliations. When Oi! was at its height, however, he says he was a Trotskyist who did his best to infuse the movement with socialist principles. He organised Oi! conferences and debates, "trying to shape the movement, trying to stop the culture of violence, talking about doing unemployment benefits, working with the Right to Work campaign, prisoners' rights gigs – I thought we could unite punk and social progress." Not everyone was receptive: "Stinky Turner was at one debate, and he didn't contribute much, apart from the classic line, 'Oi! is working class, and if you're not working class you'll get a kick in the bollocks.'" He laughs. "Perfect! That was what the Rejects were all about."

Trotskyist or not, Bushell also managed to exacerbate the problem, not least by masterminding the unfortunately titled 1981 compilation Strength Thru Oi!. "I didn't know!" he protests. "I'd been active in politics for years and had never come across the phrase 'strength through joy' as a Nazi slogan.It was the title of a Skids EP."

To compound matters, its cover featured a photograph of a skinhead who turned out to be the delectable-sounding Nicky Crane, who – nothing if not a multi-tasker – managed to combine life as a neo-Nazi activist with a secret career as a gay porn star. "I had a Christmas card on the wall, it had that image that was on the cover of Strength Thru Oi!, but washed out. I honestly, hand on my heart, thought it was a still from The Wanderers," Bushell says. "It was only when the album came through for me to approve the artwork that I saw his tattoos. Of course, if I hadn't been impatient, I would have said, right, fucking scrap this, let's shoot something else entirely. Instead, we airbrushed the tattoos out. There were two mistakes there, both mine. Hands up."

Much worse was to follow. A July 1981 Oi! gig featuring the 4-Skins and the Business in Southall – the scene of a racist murder in 1976 and the race riot that ended in the death of Blair Peach in 1979 – erupted into violent chaos: 110 people were hospitalised, and the venue, the Hambrough Tavern, was burned down after being petrol bombed. Depending on whose version of events you believe, it was either sparked by skinheads attacking Asians or Asian youths attacking gig-goers: either way, the Southall riot stopped Oi!'s commercial progress dead. The Cockney Rejects found that shops refused to stock their new album, The Power and the Glory: "I'd sung a song called Oi Oi Oi and all of a sudden there's an Oi! movement and I didn't really want anything to do with it," says Turner. "This awful, awful shit happened in Southall, we were never there, and we got the rug pulled out from under our feet. I went from the TV screen to the labour exchange in 18 months."

gary-bushellAn inflammatory article in the Daily Mail exacerbated the situation further: "We never had an problems with Nazi activists at our gigs until after the Mail's piece," says Bushell. "Only then did we have people coming down, thinking it was going to be this rightwing thing, When they discovered it wasn't, that's when the trouble started. I was attacked at an Upstarts gig at the 100 Club by about 20 of them. I had a knife pulled on me at Charing Cross station."

That should have been that, had it not been for Oi!'s curious afterlife in America. Steve Whale – who joined the Business after Southall and struggled on through the 80s, repositioning the band as "street punk" – unexpectedly found himself in possession of a US recording contract with Bad Religion's label Epitaph, lauded by bands including Boston's Irish-punk stars the Dropkick Murphys and the extraordinarily influential California band Rancid. Jeff Turner has just returned from a tour of Japan: "Osaka, Tokyo, Nagoya. I haven't got fortunes but I'm able to do that. That's all I can ask for, it makes me happy."

"I had Lars Freidricksen of Rancid come in and sit in the pub round the corner from my house, welling up, telling me if it wasn't for Oi! he might have killed himself as a teenager," says Garry Bushell. "I thought, 'Fuck me, it's really had an effect on these people.' I'm not proud of the way Oi! was misunderstood, but I'm proud of the music, proud of what it started, proud of what it gave punk."

In Britain, he concedes, the genre's name is still blackened in most people's eyes. "There were people in 1976 saying punk had to be a Nazi thing because of the swastikas. The difference is, those bands had rock journalists on their side. The Oi! bands only had me." He laughs, a little ruefully. "I did me best."


Vicious Rumours Confirmed for The Great Skinhead Reunion, Brighton 2017

Tickets 

Vicious Rumours make a comeback..Brighton Skinhead Reunion 2017.

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Question 1. Why would you like to play the great skinhead reunion, in brighton
..Symond, 2 1/2 years ago, you reached out to me and asked if we would consider playing the Reunion.. Well you and I had many exchanges, surprisingly most of them about our kids, principles and general outlook on life.. We discovered that we were very much cut from the same cloth… I was so excited to be playing and it was going to be our first show back together in England since the Main Event.. Then unfortunately we were unable due to JC and his wife expecting a baby right at that time. Symond, whilst disappointed never once showed or held it against us or me personally and we have continued to build our friendship these past couple of years.. Okay (I tend to ramble so this will be a long interview, so if edited I will take no offence) now why we/I want to play Reunion 2017.. This Event is to get together people from all over the world who love this scene and for some has been part of their lives since their early teenage years as it was for me.. I love music and ever since I can remember that has always been my first love.. Along came punk and then punk/Oi!/ska.. Well that was it. As you can see from the picture my vast taste in music.. See I told you I ramble.. What was the question? Oh yes. This is an event to see old friends, make new and a way to show our and my appreciation to you all and thank you for letting us/me be part of something that will live forever.. And this event is about just that.. Being in a band was and still is a dream for me but none of this means anything without you lot, so when Symond said yes a 2nd time to my/our request to Play 2017 my face and heart lit up and we promise to give you a show to remember.. Don't forget we are one big family xx

vicious-rumours
2. When did you start the band, and why.
in 1979 around April /may I had the idea of a starting a band. A friend of mine Dave field played guitar and another Al Kilpin was up for trying put drums.. Why, well it seemed like fun, I loved to sing and a few other kids at school had put together bands.. So why not me!!

3. Who were the original members, and how did you meet?
Okay, I met Dave Field at Church, we were I the Boys Brigade together and actually ended up going to the same school.. Al Kilpin on drums, we also met at the church in one of those kids club things, but Alan was also hanging out at the local youth clubs and knew everybody. Also Alan's good friend and co-worker was Micky F lead singer of an up and coming band called the Business. Also we had a stand in bass player, Phil Lecomber.. So that was the original up.

4. Who were the writers?
I did most of the writing once we starting playing more gigs and then the band would put it all together as at first we only had about 4 songs, including Vicious Rumours, which was actually written by a girlfriend of ours, Lesley and Dave and I wrote music.. The rest of the songs I the first few months were mainly sex pistols covers, even some early Adam and the ants, oh and Chip on your Shoulder was one we played at every gig till Bout 81..

5. What was your first gig?
Our first gig was at welling baptist church with a local band Called The Reprobates, whose guitarist Ian eventually ended up being our guitarist a couple of years later. We co-workers and recorded This is your Life together..

6. What would you say was the most memorable, for good or bad reasons?
Wow, most memorable.. Okay sorry Symond I will have to name 3..only because of different reasons and all good..
1.our first high at Skunx, May 1982. JC, AL, Worve and myself. Supporting The Business and One Way System.. It was our first Big gig in London as all the others were in local pubs, church halls and youth clubs.. It was very special and the crowd really accepted us..
2.Red Lion, Gravesend 2015..simply because it was our first gig back in the U.K in 25/26 years and the friends that showed up on a Wednesday night, in the middle of nowhere was just overwhelming.. To see so many smiles, hugs and just felt the love.. Absolutely priceless.. Plus it was my introduction to the lads in The East End Badoes.. Just a great band and brilliant blokes.. We have become friends for life..
Now there were gigs in the early days, France, Old Bexley, The Lovel, Danson youth club, Isle of wight scooter run, Coventry but for my 3rd is…
3.PSK 2015 Stockholm, Sweden and this is why.. Pike Kollberg and Niklas Törnblom put on an outstanding show.. Amazing bands and put their heart and soul into it as I know that you can relate to Symond.. They were enthusiastic, Genuine and made us feel right at home.. Now the crowd, playing to people that had never seen us before, we'll most of them, all I could feel was an amazing energy, total support and people having a great time and enjoying us.. What a beautiful feeling, this was also my 50th birthday trip so to spend it doing what I love, with people that I love and making new friends. Honestly, what could be better..
vicious-rumours-3

7. Why did the band fold up?
The band stopped playing after the main event, for me and I know for JC we were disappointed with our performance that night.. I insisted on a wireless guitar cable which didn't work, and a few other hick ups, , well we didn't talk about splitting we just took a break then in 1990 I left for the States.

8. What happened to the members after you moved on in life?
Well now, JC Lives in France, and He still loves playing his bass.. Danny lives in Malta, Ian(worve) sadly passed away a couple around a year ago as for some of the other members along the way I'm not sure but all of them had a part to play in the band..

 

skinhead-moonstomp2
9. What do you feel about the modern scene, as opposed to the 80's?
As JC would say to me and still does that I am clueless.. I just love people.. Love meeting them and being a part of an amazing culture.. Though I have seen fights break out at gigs, I myself have never once had a problem.. I am extremely happy that there is still such a strong scene as it gives us a chance to do what we love, and a chance to make memories with the best people and Symond, would you not agree making great memories and having fun is what it is all about!! I know you do mate..

10. What advice would you give to young bands starting out?
Well young bands starting out, have fun and enjoy it, be humble and appreciate anyone who shows an interest in your band, get to know some of the bands that you enjoy and could see yourself playing with, it is so easy now to get in touch with them because of the Internet etc.. and start off by just introducing yourself, let them know you have a band.. Start there.. Practice practice practice then gig gig gig.. I still reach out to bands that I have always looked up too, even at 51..The Cockney Rejects, still absolutely first class till this day. I got a message from Jeff Turner and I was like a big kid, it meant so much to me.. Micky Fitz from the day I met him at the age of 14 has always treated me with nothing but kindness and respect. He is my mentor and I have always looked up to him and appreciated the way he treated me. Although Jamie Flanagan, lead singer with Tear Up have never met we have built up a great relationship this past year and a half.. I am saying this because he has done everything that I just said to do and not because I suggested it, because of who he is.. Love ya Bruv xx
Okay last thing that I want to say is…. I love this Band, 37 years and I can honestly say the line up that we have now sounds brilliant, tight and full of energy. Mad Max Spartan back on rodie duty, keeping everything on track..Tom Sultans our youngster drummer is brilliant, Dave Hayman on guitar who just bets it out like I only wish that I could, Dave Reeves on guitar who is a fantastic solid seasoned player, John Coupé on bass and as tight and poised as ever, Nippa Troth, my little brother right there with us and Myself on vocals ready to give my all heart n soul and a night you will always remember.. Love and respect Symond and of course everyone else cannot wait to see you in Brighton..
Always, Johnny Mundy xxx

 

Tickets Here

 

Find the band on FB


Subcultz. The Home of fashion Subcultures. United We Stand!

THE GREAT SKINHEAD REUNION, BRIGHTON

What a fantastic Skinhead reunion we  have achieved every year since 2011. The numbers rose to over 700, to make it a packed house. People were welcomed from across the globe, and everyone had a ball. The Great Skinhead Reunion, Brighton will be back 1-2-3 JUNE 2018. Tickets Here

The Great Skinhead Reunion is now on its 8th year, a 3day weekender. People young and old come to Brighton from across the planet, to celebrate the Skinhead Subculture. The Event starts at noon each day. Dj's playing the very best in Skinhead history music, from the early days of Jamaican Reggae and Soul, through punk, 2tone Ska and Oi!. After 6pm Live bands hit the stage to perform until midnight, then back onto aftershow DJ's.

This is a family event, set on Brighton seafront, At the Volks bar, Madeira Drive, Brighton. The same place used in the filming of Quadrophenia, the beach that put Skinheads on the world map in the 1960's Mod era, all are welcome. you dont need to be a Skinhead. Under 18's are welcome until 9.30 due to licencing issues.

Bands so far confirmed for 2018 
Monty Neysmith (Symarip) Legend of Jamaican Reggae
The Glory (Leicesters finest Oi)

Keep an eye on our facebook page UPDATES HERE

Bands so far confirmed for 2018

The Last Resort

Monty Neysmith and The bishops (Symarip legend of Jamaican Reggae)

The Glory (Leicesters finest Oi!)

Dakka Skanks ( modern but authentic Ska rocksteady)

Martens Army (Germany)

more TBC

 

skinhead girls, great skinhead reunion, brighton

Bands to be confirmed for the Great Skinhead Reunion 2018 ...

DJ's confirmed for  2018

OLAS, Barry Bmore George, Lee Evans,  Martin long,Terry Dyatt, Phil Templar (New York),  Gabor Fuxy (Dublin)  Luc Milan (Marseilles), Glyn Wilcox, Holly Dee

TICKETS HERE

The Skinhead Reunion An ode to be in England, Sat beside the sea, With friends the world over, Enjoying everyone's company. A Brighton blast, that went fast, This years reunion is in our past, Beer was drunk in excess, We scoffed our faces full, The bands & dj's played their sounds, 3 days of living it up, 'twas never dull. Oh how we laughed & jumped about, Sharing stories as a SKINHEAD lout,

The sun was shining, the mood was great, We stared at the stars, Until it got very late, The friends we made, The ones we've not seen in years Laughing, living & chatting, Over quite a few beers We opened our eyes, To the greatest cult alive Comrades in arms, all under one roof, Skinheads together, the reunion is proof, Happy & jolly like kids with a new toy, The young & the old ones, All jumping for joy. Another reunion as passed We leave with our sad faces, On trains, buses, planes & cars, All going home to our places, But do not fear, this time next year, They have organised another Make your plans, shine your boots So we can stand side by side like sister & brother Amen Oi Oi

Adrian Lee Noon 

More good news. We have designed T Shirts, are now distributing Music for bands, Checkout Subcultz Trader


Mods and Rockers on the Beach during the May 1967 Bank Holiday.

 

Mods and Rockers on Daltons Beach during the May 1967 Bank Holiday.

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Whatever happened to the Mods and Rockers?' page

 

More than 70 mods were arrested over the weekend

Mods and Skinheads 1980

By 1980 Rockers had pretty much disappeared from british youth culture gangs. But the release of Quadrophenia in 1979 brought a new wave of Mods back onto the streets. The new enemy this time, became Skinheads, who also had seen a huge growth since Sham 69 punk and then the real boom with 2tone

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Whatever happened to the Mods and Rockers?' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Whatever happened to the Mods and Rockers?' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Whatever happened to the Mods and Rockers?' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Whatever happened to the Mods and Rockers?' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Whatever happened to the Mods and Rockers?' page
 
 

Mods and Rockers Brighton 1964

The trouble caused by mods and rockers in May 1964

 

 

Bank holidays in Brighton tended to be busy, jolly affairs in which thousands of Londoners flocked to the sea and sunshine.

All that changed in 1964 during the Whitsun bank holiday when more than a thousand mods and rockers fought pitched battles with each other on the prom and pavements.

There was more trouble in 1965 during both the Easter and August bank holidays, only this time they were met by a force of 100 policemen chosen for their barn door proportions.

Deckchairs were a favourite weapon and if they were not being used for striking enemies, they were destroyed in fires on the beach.

Photo:Mods pictured in May 1964 throwing deckchairs from the roof terrace of Brighton Aquarium on to Madeira Drive below

Mods pictured in May 1964 throwing deckchairs from the roof terrace of Brighton Aquarium on to Madeira Drive below

There were 75 arrests and the courts were kept busy for weeks afterwards in dealing with all the cases. Images of the fights went all round the world.

In a new book on the shady side of Brighton, David Boyne says, “As shocking as the violence for many of the older generation was the discovery that many of those involved were taking drugs, particularly amphetamines.”

The Brighton Council of Churches found that more than half the mods and almost half the rockers were taking blues, a form of speed.

There was more trouble in 1965 during both the Easter and August bank holidays, only this time they were met by a force of 100 policemen chosen for their barn door proportions.

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Adam Trimingham looks at the trouble caused by mods and rockers in May 1964' page

Boyne says all kinds of ideas were offered to solve the problem, including bringing back conscription, hard labour and even reviving the stocks.

Sentences handed out by Brighton magistrates were generally tough. One of them, Hebert Cushnie, referred to the youths as “sawdust Caesars”. He was widely quoted but few were sure what he meant.

But after that there was comparative peace on bank holidays until the late 1970s when the Brighton-based film Quadrophenia and the start of the punk fashion led to a mod revival.

This time the enemy was skinheads rather than rockers and confrontations Police worked out a simple but effective way of stopping youths from kicking each other. They made youths take out their bootlaces.

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Adam Trimingham looks at the trouble caused by mods and rockers in May 1964' page

Mary Whitehouse, the doughty defender of old- fashioned morals, blamed the violence by young people on copying what they saw on TV.

Less predictably, support for mods and rockers came from the National Federation of Hairdressers as both sides paid much attention to style.

Forty years ago pictures of Mods and Rockers shocked polite society. But were they staged by the press?

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Forty years ago pictures of Mods and Rockers shocked polite society. But were they staged by the press?' page

It all kicked off between the mods and the rockers this weekend in 1964. But appearances can be deceptive

Robin Stummer reports

They came, they saw, they beat each other senseless on the shingle. Or did they? Forty years ago this Easter weekend, mods took on rockers for the first time, fuelling Britain's first mass-media scare over dissolute, drug-taking, mindlessly violent youth.

They came, they saw, they beat each other senseless on the shingle. Or did they? Forty years ago this Easter weekend, mods took on rockers for the first time, fuelling Britain's first mass-media scare over dissolute, drug-taking, mindlessly violent youth.

Starting with a spot of bother at Clacton, Essex, over the Easter weekend of 1964, the tabloid press feasted for months on the gory new phenomenon breaking out at sleepy seaside towns across the South-east.

Beside gleefully horrified headlines - "Riot police fly to seaside" - were photographs of pale youths in Italian fashions fighting pale youths in engine-oil-caked leathers beside penny arcades at Margate, Brighton, Bournemouth, Clacton, Southend and Hastings.

But now mod experts and some of the old rockers and mods themselves are admitting that many of the candid newspaper shots of seaside gang fighting in 1964 - so shocking at the time, and now considered classic images of Sixties Britain - were staged.

Further, with the tales of drug-fuelled derring-do and flying deckchairs now the stuff of pop-culture legend, a new, far less violent picture is emerging of what actually happened. It's a world far removed from Quadrophenia, the cult 1979 film based on The Who's mod-nostalgia album.

"There are famous photographs taken in Brighton where the photographer paid the lads a few shillings," says David Cooke, a Brighton-based mod ephemera dealer and an authority on the history and lore of the mod world. "Quite a few people know that photographs were set up in Brighton."

Finding that gangs were engaged not in open warfare but aimless wandering, some photographers and reporters paid youths to stage mock fights and chases.

"At Margate some photographs were definitely staged," recalls Howard Baker, in 1964 a purist mod and now a writer whose novel Sawdust Caesar is set against mid-1960s mod culture. "Reporters and photographers were paying off a lot of kids. You'd get a fiver or a tenner. We'd get pissed on it."

"The media made it sound much worse than it really was," says rocker Phil Bradley, a veteran of dozens of seaside "visits" in the Sixties and a repentant mod-baiter. Bradley became a rocker at 14 when he bought his first motorbike, and spent most of his teens trading insults with the scootering mods. But bloodshed? "There wasn't as much fighting as what has been made out," he says. "The press hyped it right up. There were only isolated incidents. There weren't riots like in that film Quadrophenia. The odd deckchair came flying through the air, but there weren't weapons like you see nowadays.

"And we certainly didn't go chasing after old people, even us rockers. If we saw an old lady going across the road having trouble, we'd walk across with her."

Tabloid headlines about the drug menace facing Britain's youth, which for a few months in mid-1964 alternated with seaside warfare headlines, pointed to another glaring falsehood. "There was an idea that amphetamines, which were the mod pill of choice at the time, caused us all to be terribly aggressive, but that wasn't the case," says Alfredo Marcantonio, 40 years ago a devoted mod and now a leading figure in British advertising. "Most of the time you danced your socks off in clubs, but afterwards you were so worn out you wouldn't want to fight anyone."

No, says Howard Baker, there was real fighting as well as fake fighting. "The Brighton photographs weren't staged. I was there. The violence was nasty, but there weren't guns."

Mods were not averse to fighting other mods, rather than rockers. "It wasn't really mods versus rockers, as the press put it, anyway," says David Cooke. "Mods were fighting each other. The north London mods hated south London mods. South London mods hated north London mods, and east London mods hated everybody, and everybody hated them."

"You could almost tell which part of London a mod was from by which colour suit he had," recalls Mr Marcantonio. One of many early mods who went into advertising and the media, he remembers spats, but maintains pitched battles did not happen. "The streets were not strewn with broken deckchairs," he says. "The police herded you up and you ended up walking around Brighton in the great phalanxes of people looking a bit pissed off.

"The seaside towns were the domain of the rocker, their patch," he explains. "Every rocker, you imagined, dreamt of working on the dodgems, with the sound of Del Shannon echoing past the helter-skelter. So a lot of us turning up on scooters, it was asking for trouble. But mods didn't ever get on their scooters and go down to the coast for a fight. Real mods were far too concerned about their clothing. I mean, we're talking about possibly losing buttons - you know, creasing or tearing clothing you'd saved for!"

But isolated outbreaks of violence did continue throughout the Sixties. "The Battle of Hastings, about 1965, was quite a big one," remembers Phil Bradley. "Some scooters and bikes went off the top of the cliff. Margate in 1964 was the worst - the cells filled up. There were only seven coppers in Margate at the time, and one Black Maria - but there were about 4,000 mods and 500 rockers!"

In the end, the mod movement mutated. "Everyone diverged," says Howard Baker. "Lots of mods became hippies or freaks and wandered off to India, like I did."

"I haven't the foggiest idea why there was any fighting with the mods," says Phil Bradley. "I really don't know."

The Independent

 


 
 
 
 

The early 1980s revival ebbed away and since then all resorts including Brighton have not suffered from large-scale fighting by violent gangs of youths.

It is almost half a century now since the first clashes and some of the combatants have become nostalgic about them.

Every September there is a huge convoy of men on motorbikes and scooters who ride down to Brighton for the day.

Now mostly pensioners, they reminisce about what they see as the good old days while often drinking nothing stronger than tea.

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Adam Trimingham looks at the trouble caused by mods and rockers in May 1964' page

By Adam Trimingham

  • Bloody British History: Brighton by David J. Boyne (The History Press £9.99)
 
 
 
 
 

Skinhead Girls, Derek Ridgers 1980

Who are the subjects in the iconic "Skinhead girls, Bank Holiday, Brighton 1980" photo by Derek Ridgers used in Morrissey's 1992 "Your Arsenal" tour as a backdrop and merchandise (t-shirt, program cover)? Finally we know - Caroline and Debbie. Both were together recently and surprisingly, both learned just last weekend (Aug. 2016) about the use of the photo on Morrissey's tour 24 years ago.

Debbie writes through emails:

I am one of the skinhead girls in the photo as I have just found out my picture was used... Caroline on the left, I'm on the right (in both 1980 and 2016 photos, below). She moved to Australia and was over last weekend. That's when we found out via Google about the photo, such a shock but a nice one. Eyes nearly popped out when we saw the huge backdrop of us.

I have been in touch with Derek, he is sending us a photo as we never got one. Sent him a photo of what we look like now and he thinks we haven't changed (well, longer hair and older). Does anyone have any tour mementos?

Caroline lives in Perth, Australia, is married with 3 children and also a granny.

I live in Surrey, married, with 1 son and work in community nursing.

We was both wild when young, me being the worst as my mum tells me.

Skinhead Girls London 1980. derek Ridgers

 


The Great Skinhead Reunion Brighton 2018. 1-2-3rd June Tickets and Information

TICKETS 

 

FULL 3 DAYS EVENT, YOUR WRISTBAND IS VALID THROUGH OUT, YOU CAN USE IT FOR AS LITTLE, OR AS MUCH AS YOU WANT. THE EVENT WILL SELL OUT.

WRISTBANDS GIVE YOU FULL ACCESS TO ALL THE EVENT, THREE FULL DAYS AND NIGHTS OF ENTERTAINMENT, 12 BANDS, 10 DJ'S PLUS A  SPECIAL PRE PARTY  BEACH BBQ ON THURSDAY 1ST JUNE

 

 

The line-up maybe subject to change, as so many band members and dj's are involved. Babies coming along, alcohol, world wars and famine can be unforeseen, but the Great Skinhead Reunion, is more about coming to Brighton to see all your friends and making some more, for 3 full days of mayhem.

skinhead girl

SKINHEAD ONLY HOTELS .

Add to your experience, by getting a room in our Skinhead only hotels. Conveniently located, with a short walk to the venue, and no moaning neighbours to worry about. The rooms vary in size and cost, to fit your needs. all within an easy walk to the skinhead reunion venue. We have hotels exclusive to the Great Skinhead Reunion guests and bands.  Party party !! please email subcultz@gmail.com with your requirements, to be booked into the Skinhead Hotels

 

For those on a low budget, its worth checking Hostels and campsites, but my advice, is to get in the reserved hotels, for a nice stress free, clean and comfortable holiday in Brighton.

TRAVEL INFORMATION

Brighton is situated on the south coast of England, approximately one hour from London. London Gatwick is the nearest airport. There are regular direct trains and National Express buses. The next nearest is Heathrow,  There are also direct trains from Luton Airport . Its advised not to fly to Stansted, as this is a long way, and you risk losing valuable drinking time

The nearest ferry port serving mainland Europe is Newhaven -Dieppe . Newhaven is about 20 min drive to Brighton. Dover is about 2 hours to Brighton

PARKING ZONES - one of the worst aspects of Brighton, is a lack of affordable parking. my advice is to use street parking on the suburbs of Brighton, its a reasonably safe place. a good bus service will take you into brighton centre (churchill square) and a short walk from there to the sea front. worth allowing the extra hours work, to save yourself serious parking charges

All Event Enquiries email Symond at subcultz@gmail.com. phone (uk) 07733096571

The Facebook community group Facebook group

Facebook page

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Welcome to The Great Skinhead Reunion, Brighton 2017 2-3-4th June

SKINHEAD REUNION TICKETS HERE

pete reunion crowd

 

Well here we are on the 7th Great Skinhead Reunion, and what a journey its been. From the humble beginnings of a plan born from the real heart ache of losing such good friends of mine, that were the Wycombe skinheads 1978-90.

skinhreads watching a band

As I have mentioned, my heartache was also mixed with guilt, for not being there when my friends needed me most, we had flown our own ways. When one of them cut his own throat in prison, after he had murdered 2 people who he loved. When another had experienced 10 years of post traumatic stress, due to his friend being shot and killed in his arms, whilst in the army. My friend left, got onto heroin and lived the life of a bum in a shop doorway for some years, before dying a week after I bumped into him.. the other lads have equally tragic stories. These are societies embarrassment. The people they don't want to know, from place they don't want to go.

Skinheads at the Great Skinhead Reunion, Brighton, England

But they were my friends, the kids I grew up with, the violent days of the 1980's you couldn't have wished for a more loyal crew. But as times changed, life moved on. The boots found their way to a dusty loft. The kids came along, and their school uniform or bike took priority over a gig and a beer out with your mates. New families were born. But for some, that never happened. They were thrown onto the wasteland of humanity, too traumatised and abused, to know how to live a 'normal' life. They were kings of the skinhead world. Respected, adored and loved. But as the crew broke up, the regular Friday drink no longer. The party was over, replaced by a lonely world of weed, Coke and smack, rejected even by the people they knew as friends

black and white skinheads, great skinhead reunion, brighton

But that bond and connection of being Skinheads stayed with all of us, even if it wasn't always obvious from the outside. We left the council estate, left the town , mixed with people from every corner of the globe, became friends with the dreaded middle class. Personally I travelled to many exotic places, Indian Hindu temples, Buddhist retreats in Sri Lanka, Fighting the demons of the mind. Mexico, South America. Living the life of a gypsy, working on large festivals like Glastonbury. Selling the Roundhouse gig out with my dear friend Poly Styrene and Xray Spex. But in me, the skinhead was always there. 12 years of fighting the system, every street gang and bootboy that came my way, was a grounding. It helped me in those later years, when I beat the fuck out of a rapist on a train in Malaysia, when I was surrounded by crazed knife wielding Indians in Hubli , southern India, after witnessing a religious based riot in which three people were hacked to death. The skinhead street fighter was there. When some street muggers tried their luck with cs gas up Holloway road, after an oasis show. The Skinhead was always there. Even when I was going to Hare Krishna meetings to support poly styrene and her severe mental health issues, we often talked about our days as punks and skinheads. We were connected on that deeper level, that the music industry hangers on, that so desperately wanted to be around the fame and fortune, could never begin to understand.

I was a Dad, and living my life, a million miles away from the Micklefield council estate, but then the phone calls came of another friend taken so soon, another trip back to my home town, the old pub, the same roads, but the faces older, the sadness so severe.

I knew I had to do something for them, for me, and for every skinhead in the UK, and in fact the World. I wanted no part in the violence, I wanted no part in faction, division or soap box politics. I definitely wanted no part in hate. Would anyone feel the way I did, were there any real skinheads left in this world?

wycombe skinheads 2013

THE WYCOMBE SKINHEADS

Well this weekend we will see a minimum of 600 skinheads in Brighton. You have come from Finland, Norway, Australia, USA, Germany, France, Holland, Belgium, Spain, Italy, Eastern Europe,Brazil, Argentina, From the northern towns of England, Scotland. From Dublin and Belfast, from the West and East. You have all come to be as one, to a place where you can truly be among your own. The Reggae music for the soul, the Oi for the blood. The beer to pickle the brain.

Every one of you representing a subculture we all built, that has spread the world. Its bigger than any one of us, its bigger than any faction, any hate...............SKINHEADS, UNITED WE STAND!!!

There will be 3 full days and nights of the scenes best DJ's and bands invited from across the world to perform. We choose the very best to play, and all represent a genuine part of skinhead history, SKA, Punk, and Oi! From across the planet.

We also hold our End of Summer Northern Skinhead gathering. in the same Spirit as Brighton. 2 days of partying and drinking, with the best bands and friends a person could ask for

Great  Skinhead Northern Gathering Tickets Here

great-skinhead-northern-gathering-flyer